Chemix Pre Workout: Guerilla Chemist’s Cognitive Pre Has Risen!

Guerilla Chemist

The man, the myth, The Guerilla Chemist. Now with his own brand, Chemix.

It’s been a long time coming, but everyone’s favorite industry chemist, The Guerilla Chemist, has finally dropped a new pre-workout. This something nearly every hardcore sports nutrition fan has been waiting to see. Does the product live up to its own hype?!

The Premise: A Focus Formulation Gone Guerilla

Bryan Moskow, better known as The Guerilla Chemist, has been formulating supplements while providing amazing free content for a long time. On his titular Instagram, he often discusses chemical compounds, hard-to-find info on legal gray-zone anabolics, and other aspects of supplementation that fly over everyone else’s heads. The attention to detail he puts into his content led many to demand he put out products — and put out products he did. After stint helping out Blackstone Labs and MyoBlox, he has dropped a pre-workout under his own brand — Chemix, and it all begins with the Chemix Pre Workout.

The Chemist brings the mood and cognition support in a major way

Chemix Pre Workout

Finally, we get to see what happens when you unleash The Guerilla Chemist for a Pre Workout that’s nearly all about the stimulants and nootropics!

Chemix, at its heart, is an edgy and aggressive brand, so it’s no surprise to see a high-stimulant pre-workout as the initial release. The serving size is serious at 15g per scoop, especially considering that there are no nitric oxide boosters and no ergogenics that often take up tons of space! This one’s nearly all about the brain-game.

Chasing the “King Of Stims” Title

This is definitely a one-scooper, as we seriously don’t recommend going any heavier with a product that contains a confirmed 350mg caffeine per serving and a ton of other edgy stimulants and nootropics. While the formula is like a gathering of unique ingredients for those that know the industry, Bryan threw in some mood-boosting bonuses like Kanna (an ingredient he clearly loves) and plenty of mushroom extracts that we’ll discuss.

We have the full story below — including an epic quote from TGC — but before you read on, check PricePlow’s coupon-powered prices and sign up for our Chemix news alerts because we’re expecting a lot more from TGC and the brand:

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A quote from Guerilla Chemist

We asked Bryan to explain his strategy behind the supplement, and he emailed us a fantastic explanation of what’s going on here (especially with his sizey Kanna dose that we’ll discuss below). Here’s what he had to say:

“James and I are very excited to launch our brand Chemix. It’s been a long time coming! The pre workout we just launched is an extremely unique formula that took me over a year to get it to where I wanted it.

One ingredient that really stands out is the Kanna. Kanna is mood enhancing herb that contains alkaloids that can increase monoamines like dopamine, serotonin and adrenaline, as well as acting as a natural SRI. The main effect of kanna is focus, anti-anxiety, mood enhancement and euphoria. Most companies use 25mg where I wanted to use a dose more indicative to how it’s used in South Africa (where it’s natively grown). After trying a bunch of different doses, I settled on 1000mg which really interacts with the other stimulants in the product in a way where it not only enhances the effect, but negates any crash you would expect.

Overall, I’m very happy with how it turned out and now my focus is on bringing other products to the line. We have an intra workout that will be released next, and then a non-stim pump product, as well as a few other cool things in the works.”

— Bryan Moskow (The Guerilla Chemist), Chemix Co-Founder and CEO

Now it’s time to get into the background:

Science Behind Chemix

Stolen from the Chemix website, but we’re about to drive in as well!

Chemix Pre Workout Ingredients

  • Peak O2 (2g)

    Chemix Pre Workout Ingredients Panel

    Get a peak into the mind of TGC. The nootropic and energy-focused Chemix Pre Workout Ingredients.

    Led primarily by Cordyceps militaris, PeakO2 is a patented blend of performance-enhancing mushrooms. Sold by Compound Solutions, the ingredient has a ton of extremely interesting research supporting its use as an ergogenic aid. Over time and anecdotal use, it’s one of those compounds that just gets better and better as we see the research pan out and use it over the course of time.

    An investigation in 2016 concluded that Cordyceps militarismay be an effective method for enhancing aerobic performance and delaying fatigue by improving oxygen kinetics” in trained athletes” — this study is enticing as it used PeakO2![1] The athletes that received PeakO2 had a significant advantage in VO2 max, endurance, and power output over a placebo group.

    While one may call out the dose used in the study isn‘t present in Chemix (2g vs 4g used in the study) — more recent research shows that a dose as low as 2g is beneficial too! The College of Charleston dropped a paper in 2017 confirming that athletes can enjoy the benefits of PeakO2 in doses as little as 2g a day,[2] it just takes a bit longer to build up. In 2g a day, Cordycepts may decrease time to fatigue, improve VO2 max, and reduce blood lactate levels. The same investigation confirmed that if you’re in an extreme hurry, doses up to 12g a day can work much faster — as athletes in this dosage group enjoyed additional benefits like decreases in submaximal heart rate and improved peak power output. Note they did not do these studies with elite athletes — but most of us aren’t elite athletes to begin with.[2]

    PeakO2 Benefits

    PeakO2 has several benefits for hard-training athletes, especially those who need a bump of endurance

    Anecdotally, we notice easier breathing and reduced heart rate with PeakO2, having good experience using a chest-strap heart rate monitor when training.

    Realize that Cordyceps Militaris is the star of the show in PeakO2, but it’s a proprietary blend in and of itself, and we’re not sure how much the other mushrooms (Reishi, King Trumpet, Shiitake, Lion’s Mane, and Turkey Tail) are helping. But in this 2g dose, lifters can expect improved endurance, increased power output, and less of that nasty acid-burn that arises from lactic acid spillover if using it for a few weeks straight.[1-2]

  • GlycerPump (3g)

    Meet Chemix Pre Workout’s sole pump ingredient!

    GlycerPump is a patented form of glycerol. While glycerol supplements are plagued by terrible formulations and powder clumping, Pinnacle Labs changed everything when they invented GlycerPump. GlycerPump contains 65% glycerol by weight like some competitors, but doesn’t spoil as others do, and mixes well in powders (in fact, it straight up tastes great). They developed GlycerPump by creating a spray driving procedure that allows for a higher quality extract than their competition.

    GlycerPump Logo

    GlycerPump is a new, stable from of 65% glycerol powder made by Pinnacle Ingredients.

    Lifters supplement glycerol as a hydration boosting agent — which can lead to pumps we refer to as “water pumps.” Glycerol will help force water into your cells — as long as you hydrate. More water in a cell means a bigger muscle, so we’re sure you can figure out where the term “water pump” came from.[3] For endurance athletes, glycerol is a superb rehydration tool, but truth be told, we’re mostly here for vanity purposes and many users love the “swole” feeling and look it provides. We highly recommend drinking a ton of water with Chemix — as 3g is a very solid dose and some of the highest we’ve seen.

    As mentioned above, it’s the only pump ingredient in Chemix Pre. This clearly means a nitric oxide boosting stim-free supplement is going to get stacked in…

  • Kanna (2:1 Extract std to NLT 0.5% alkaloids) (1g)

    Kanna is an interesting herb that is enjoying the spotlight after years of negligence. No doubt, The Guerilla Chemist has a huge affinity for it, as it comes up in nearly every conversation we have with him!

    Chemix Pre Workout Supercharge

    Supercharge your workouts… and your mood too, given this monster dose of Kanna!

    Sceletium Tortuosum or Kanna, acts pharmacokinetically as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor.[4] When phosphodiesterases are blocked — cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) builds up in cells. Research links this increase in cAMP to the beneficial aspects of Kanna — Kanna may boost your mood, relieve chronic stress, and even help you fall asleep after all the caffeine in Chemix Pre wears off.[4-5]

    Kanna is in Chemix as the “mood boosting” element that have become a consumer expectation in hardcore pre-workouts. We applaud Bryan for not going the “old dirt road” with Chemix, as it feels like every damn product has PEA in it now. Kanna is an incredible mood booster that we feel each and every time we use it.

    The dose here is also massive as 1g towers above its competition — reaching heights we’ve never seen nor tried yet. As Guerilla’s quote states up above, this was meant to mimic the way the ingredient is used in the actual food supply! No doubt, this is one thing to look forward to feeling soon after you finish your last sip!

  • Lion’s Mane (600mg) std to a min of 25% Beta D-glucans

    Lion's Mane Nerve Cells

    Lion’s Mane is able to stimulate growth in brain cells.

    Lion’s Mane is an underrated mushroom included in the PeakO2 blend, but Guerilla knows the truth – we want more! Long-time followers of our blog posts know we consistently rave about products that include Lions Mane — so we’re stoked to see it make the Chemix cut.

    Lion’s Mane — or Hericium erinaceus is a mushroom supplemented for its long-term nootropic effects. Research supports the notion that Lion’s Mane may increase levels of nerve growth factor in the brain — which may boost memory, memory recall, and overall cognitive function.[6-8] If Kanna is the feel good part of Chemix — Lion’s Mane is the focus element.

    600mg is a perfect middle of the road dose, but the real story is the standardization: Bryan gives the beta d-glucan content on the label which is the active nootropic component of Lion’s Mane. A minimum of 25% is a high quality extract so we’re happy here. Lifters should also keep in mind that PeakO2 is delivering Lion’s Mane as well — so this is a mushroom-lovers dream supplement.

  • Exothermic Energy Amalgam (2647mg)

    A prop-blend by any name is still a prop blend. We’re bummed that The Guerilla Chemist didn’t fully let us into his brain, but apparently he’s got some goods to protect here. This can frustrate customers as consumers often like to know how many stimulants they’re getting per dose, so it’s great to know that they have confirmed 350mg caffeine per scoop.

    Guerilla Chemist Pre Workout

    The Guerilla Chemist went with a prop blend to protect the stimulatory part of his pre workout… but we at least know how much caffeine we’re going to end up with! (350mg)

    No doubt, the supplement industry is a market of copycat brands and Bryan is someone worth copying. He likely spent a ridiculous amount of time perfecting Chemix and wanted to protect his formulation.

    No matter how you slice this, though, we’re looking at a really good focus formula:

    • L-Tyrosine

      L-Tyrosine is the common ancestor of the catecholamines: dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine.[9] By providing more building blocks, the body can produce more catecholamines. This is a wonderful thing — as the catecholamines are the closest thing mammals have to a “feel good” button in our brains.

      L-Tyrosine also works with caffeine, as caffeine helps drive up the amount of catecholamine being released by cells. It can also improve cognitive function.[9]

    • DMAE

      DMAE

      DMAE (Dimethylaminoethanol) is a nootropic related to choline that may improve focus, mental clarity, and potentially memory.

      DMAE, or dimethylaminoethanol is a choline-like compound that occurs in mammalian brains. We also get it in our diet from fatty fish. Athletes supplement DMAE as a way of increasing the amount of acetylcholine available for neural communication. It does so by inhibiting the breakdown of produced acetylcholine.[10-11] Acetylcholine is acts in neural processes like memory formation, concentration, and mood regulation so expect nootropic enjoys DMAE. As the second ingredient in the blend, it’s a big dose!

      This is where things got really good. Given that we know caffeine, no matter how you slice it, we’re going to get a really solid dose of L-Tyrosine and/or DMAE for focus. We hope DMAE is above 500mg… knowing some of Guerilla’s older formulas from previous brands, we’re confident he did just that.

    • Caffeine Anhydrous and Caffeine Citrate ~350mg

      Caffeine is the most used drug in the world — so we won’t bore you with the fact it will help you stay awake and increase your power output all while helping you get lean. The caffeine per serving here is large so please be responsible with your dosing![12-13]

      Note the use of both caffeine anhydrous and caffeine citrate. James told us that there’s 350mg caffeine total. One thing we’ve noticed is that caffeine citrate seems to punch faster.

    • N,N-DMPEA Citrate

      N,N-Dimethylphenethylamine Citrate is the hottest form of PEA supplementation in sports nutrition, and this is the next most important dose we’d love to see disclosed.

      N-Phenethyldimethylamine 2D Receptor with Protection Highlighted

      N-Phenethyldimethylamine is like a PEA molecule, but with an N,N’ Alkyl section that also prevents MAO from cleaving it… meaning a longer-lasting euphoric ‘buzz’ than regular PEA

      Regular PEA is a straight-up feel-good ingredient,[14-15] but with a caveat: it’s broken down by monoamine oxidases rapidly.[16] Because of that, we always look for ways to keep it around longer, either with a light MAO inhibitor or a modified form of the PEA molecule (or a bit of both). In this molecule’s case, we have the latter — the two alkyl groups prevent the MAO enzymes from cleaving the PEA off of our dopamine receptors too quickly, and we get a nice, long, euphoric buzz. But in the next ingredient, we’re going to get some MAO inhibition too!

      At this point, with all the nootropics and mood enhancers, it should be extremely clear: Chemix Pre Workout is going to feel damned good… so long as a couple of the stims below don’t come on too strong!

    • Rhodiola Rosea

      Rhodiola Rosea

      Rhodiola Rosea: Our favorite feel-good herb with some additional workout boosting properties

      Rhodiola Rosea, comparable to Ginseng and Ashwagandha, is one of the most used adaptogens in the supplement industry. The industry has taken a serious turn towards ashwagandha, so we’re very excited to see Guerilla take a left turn and bring us some of this Viking’s brew.

      Rosea is well-known for its fatigue-reducing effects, so it’ll sync up well with the other energizing elements of Chemix.[17] Beyond making you feel less tired, Rosea is good for you in just about every damn possible way and we’ll take it whenever we can get it.[17-18]

      And best of all? It’s been shown to have MAO inhibition properties,[29-30] which may make the PEA buzz from the N,N-DMPEA up above last a bit longer!

    • Higenamine HCl

      Some refer to Higenamine as baby ephedrine. Higenamine is a beta-2 adrenergic agonist, like its bigger brother ephedrine.[19] While not nearly as potent, higenamine is a nice stimulant in its own right. It provides energy by hastening the breakdown of fatty acids, so it may help you stay leaner too.[19]

      Higenamine Weight Loss

      A higenamine-based supplement (with caffeine and yohimbe) increases plasma free fatty and glycerol for at least a few hours

      When taken alone with caffeine on an empty stomach, many get an appetite suppressant effect too. We’re not sure if you’ll have anything like that here, but it’s cool to keep in the back pocket if struggling with those food ‘addictions’.

    • Theophylline anhydrous

      Theophylline is a methylxanthine, like caffeine. It’s is a great compound to add to Chemix as it has synergetic potential with both caffeine in Kanna. Theophylline is both phosphodiesterase inhibitor (like Kanna) and an adenosine receptor antagonist (like caffeine).[21-22]

      We don’t see Theophylline used often and its inclusion highlights the chemist’s industry experience.

    • N-Isopropylnorsynephrine

      One of the replacements for DMAA, especially in thermogenic formulas, N-isopropylnorsynephrine is a strong lipolytic agent — meaning it’ll boost your energy levels by freeing fatty acids up for energy.[23] This is yet another example of synergy at play, as it plays with higenamine. These two together may be one of the closest things you get to ephedrine, which is one of the highest compliments we can pay a stimulant.

      This one is interesting as there is a study showing that this isopropyl form is superior to the bitter orange extract we see in fat-loss agents.[23] The dosage here is likely very small, and this may drive how wild the ride is for Chemix Pre Workout.

    • Rauwolscine 90%

      Chemix Logo

      Chemix has landed!

      Rauwolscine, or alpha yohimbine, is the most potent diastereoisomer of yohimbine. A word of caution on alpha Y: some users can’t live without it and many lifters never want to be within 5 feet of it ever again.

      Once again, this is where dosage really matters. We love it at 1.5mg or less – just enough to get you going. Take 3mg or more and times are less fun. Perhaps Guerilla will share his strategy! Reason being, Alpha Y is a potent stimulant but also a potent anxiogenic compound — at high enough doses, researchers have used it to induce panic attacks![24-25]

    • Huperzine A from Huperzia Serrata(leaf) standardized extract

      Huperzine is one of our favorite supporting nootropics. It works like DMAE up above, as it prevents the breakdown of acetylcholine. Combined with DMAE and Lion’s Mane — you feel more cognitively agile after you dose Chemix. Its effects on acetylcholine levels may improve neural health, slow brain cell death, and may even help denovo neurogenesis.[26-28]

Flavors Available and Inactives

Chemix Pre Workout Flavors

Which Flavor? Citrus Cooler Or Guerrilla Juice?

Chemix’s pre-workout is available in two flavors: citrus cooler and fruit punch (Guerilla Juice). Even the inactive ingredients are interesting as the first listed is erythritol – a sugar alcohol. Natural and artificial flavors come next. From what we can tell, erythritol, sucralose, and citric acid are the heavy flavor helpers here.

Note that Chemix used artificial coloring, so sensitive users may want to sit this product out… but obviously this entire product’s not for sensitive users!

Stacking: Looking at you, nitric oxide

You’ll notice that Chemix Pre Workout contains no nitric oxide boosters! So that’s the logical next step, finding your favorite stim-free NO booster to add in (no glycerol needed there due to our 3g GlycerPump).

At the time of publishing, Chemix just released a carb-based Intra Workout, but still, no nitric oxide. We can only guess something big is going to come from that angle eventually…

Conclusion: The holy grail of brain boosting pre workouts?!

Well damn. Everyone’s been waiting for a new pre workout from the mind of Guerilla Chemist, and this is it. A near pure brain booster, with a surprisingly large scoop given no citrulline or citrulline malate!

Chemix Logo Square

In one word: wow!

Chemix is one of the most interesting pre-workouts we’ve seen yet, but the dosing of two ingredients — isopropylnorsynephrine and alpha yohimbine — will be make-it-or-break it when reviewing. This is why the prop blend throws us off… and now there’s only one way to find out – by taking a scoop down!

There is so much synergy between ingredients on this label we’re drooling for more formulations like this, and we’ve got to believe a nitric oxide booster will be one of them. Chemix is the first example of The Guerilla Chemist unrestrained and we’re extremely excited for what he drops next.

Lifters that don’t compete in WADA-tested sports, that don’t suffer from anxiety, and that love the “up” feeling of stimulants should give this a shot. If you don’t feel this one even at half a scoop, we’re not sure what to tell you, because this may even awaken the dead with its focus powers.

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About the Author: Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is a biohacker with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several "n=1" experiments done on himself.

Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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