Gold Star Triple X: The first 2-Aminoisoheptane Pre Workout!

Gold Star Triple-X Pre Workout

Triple X from Gold Star is a focus centric pre workout that uses the brand new stimulant DMHA, 2-aminoisoheptane.

If you’re a regular reading of the PricePlow blog, you noticed not too long ago we wrote a comprehensive piece on the brand new stimulant of 2016, 2-Aminoisoheptane, which we’re referring to as DMHA. In that same article, we mentioned that only two products on the market currently use it, both made by Gold Star Performance Products.

So we’re here today with the analysis of their pre workout, Triple X, that promises “laser focus, intense energy, and incredible pumps.”

Gold Star Triple X Quick Notes

  • The first product/brand to reintroduce DMHA to the market
  • Feels incredible, even at ⅔ dose, but…
  • Proprietary blend with underdosed / pixie-dusted nonsense

The full breakdown is just ahead, but before we get there, take a second to check the best deal and sign up for alerts from PricePlow:

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Disclaimer: Higher up the risk scale, advanced/experienced users only

Now, before we begin, we must warn you that this supplement is for advanced users who have a doctor’s clean written consent and are not on any prescription drugs. This is based upon an undisclosed dosage of a new stimulant with no long-term human safety testing, so it is “riskier” than taking a caffeine-only pre workout, and conservative users may want to stay on the sidelines.

Triple X Ingredients

The profile on Triple X isn’t anything groundbreaking or novel, but the one interesting ingredient that will have the industry abuzz is the new stim 2-Aminoisoheptane (DMHA). Unfortunately, we don’t know exactly how much of it there is in Triple X because Gold Star has opted to go with a prop blend:

  • Triple X Proprietary Blend (6,2520mg)

    • N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine

      Gold Star Triple-X Ingredients

      Triple X is all about pumps, energy, and focus, too bad it’s all hidden behind a prop blend.

      Things get rolling right off the bat with the focus booster, N-Acetyl-Tyrosine (NALT). It’s the more bioavailable, and expensive, form of the amino acid, L-Tyrosine.

      NALT increases the production of two critical neurotransmitters in the body, dopamine and noradrenaline which help enhance improve mood and focus, while decreasing stress and anxiety.[1,2]

    • Arginine AKG

      Arginine AKG, or AAKG, was another popular ingredient used in pre workouts of yesteryear. While we all know L-Arginine isn’t that great at boosting nitric oxide levels in the body, binding it to an alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) salt should improve its bioavailability and uptake in the body.

      AAKG has been shown in clinical trials to successfully boost nitric oxide levels a bit and reducing the cost of oxygen use during exercise.[3] We’re just not sure how much is included, and if the amount included will really boost N.O. levels all that much…

    • L-Citrulline Malate

      Now, here’s a nitric oxide booster that really does work! Citrulline Malate is a combination of L-Citrulline and Malic acid proven not only be more effective than L-Arginine, but also more bioavailable, leading to a much bigger, badder pump![4]

      Increased Nitric Oxide levels also enhance endurance, strength, and athletic performance.[5,6] One last interesting tidbit on Citrulline Malate is that it’s heavily involved in the Krebs Cycle, which buffers (“removes”) ammonia and lactic acid from the body. This leads to greater stamina and endurance during workouts.[7]

    • Caffeine Anhydrous

      Gold Star Triple X Strongest

      Triple X feels great at 3/4 scoop according to Mike, we’ll have a full breakdown and review on Triple X soon!

      Note: This is labeled as Methylxanthine anhydrous on the label, a different name for caffeine anhydrous.

      Before we get to the shiny new stim, let’s take a second to honor the age old stimulant that’s not going away ANYTIME soon: caffeine anhydrous. So much can be said about caffeine, but you probably know the majority of it.

      It’s been around a long time and loved by virtually everyone. When used pre workout, it’s great for increasing energy, focus, and stamina. Unfortunately, we have no clue how much is in here…

      If you’re sensitive to stims, it’s probably best to start with ½-¾ scoop just until you get the feel of our next ingredient…

    • 2-Aminoisoheptane

      2-Aminoisoheptane

      DMHA with 2D Structure with PEA Backbone Highlighted

      Warning: this section makes some assumptions regarding the actual compound shown here. There are a few chemical compounds that can fall under this ingredient name, addressed below.

      Here’s the main (only?) reason to go out and grab a tub of Triple X, a fun new stimulant!

      We believe that this is DMHA, and Gold Star bills this as a “breakthrough ingredient that produces the same results as geranium oil (DMAA) and AMP citrate.” We’re not entirely sure that’s true, but it’s not far from our experiences!

      DMHA has a similar structures to that of DMAA and AMP Citrate (DMBA). All of these compounds are classified as “psychostimulants.”[8]

      DMHA also increases levels of various monoamines in the body, most notably norepinephrine and dopamine.[9,10] Once these start flooding the body, you’ll feel the typical effects induced by other stimulants including increased alertness and mood![11]

      All of these things sound great, but we just wished we knew how much of this stuff was in there!

      Addressing some labeling confusion
      Aconitum Kusnezoffii

      Sources state that aconitum contains DMHA, but it’s a toxic plant family, so using this in compliance arguments is a riskier endeavor, whether or not your extracting it.

      On the label, this is shown as Aconitum Kusnezoffii, but we’re not really having that – it’s a toxic plant and we really assume we’re not getting DMHA from it (but can’t be fully sure since the label does state aconitum).

      More than likely, this is synthetic 2-amino-6-methylheptane, also 1,5-Dimethylhexylamine (hence the DMHA). We don’t like the name 2-aminoisoheptane because it’s vague – there are other compounds (such as 2-amino-5-methylheptane) that could also fall under the name 2-aminoisoheptane. So there’s an off-chance that this ingredient could be 2-amino-5-methylheptane, which is slightly different than the DMHA linked above, but still has some stimulatory behavior.

      Rumor has it that there is also a safely-eaten fruit / foodstuff that contains this compound, which would help clear up any compliance risk, but we have not yet figured out what that fruit is.

      Either way, we’ve tried Triple X, and it works as expected. The feel-good focus is there.

      We hear that Gold Star is going to have a new upgraded pre workout coming out soon. We hope that this gets clarified, along with the removal of the two pixie-dusted ingredients that follow:

    • Beta Alanine

      Beta Alanine is a proven workout booster best known for giving people the “tingles.” Don’t worry though, you won’t get anywhere near 3g worth in a single scoop of Triple X, being that it’s this far down the prop blend list.

      Beta Alanine increases your power and endurance, due to increasing levels of carnosine (a powerful intracellular buffer) in the muscle.[12,13]

      This is so underdosed it’s not even funny

      If you actually get 3.2g per day in (and this is more likely about 3% of that clinical dose), BA also enhances muscle growth[14] and reduces fatigue brought on by longer athletic events or gym sessions.[15]

      And if you thought this was underdosed, wait until the next ingredient…

    • Di-Creatine Malate

      Creatine monohydrate is so freaking cheap, WHY DO COMPANIES UNDERDOSE IT?!!!

      Creatine monohydrate is so freaking cheap, WHY DO COMPANIES UNDERDOSE IT?!!!

      Once again, another ridiculously underdosed ingredient here, likely just for the window dressing. Don’t be fooled, if you’re trying to make gains, you need 3-5g creatine per day outside of this.

      In terms of the ingredient itself, Di-Creatine Malate is a hybrid form of creatine that bonds it to malic acid to help improve the bioavailability of creatine. The general idea is that this ensures creatine is efficiently absorbed by the muscles and not broken down in the stomach prior to uptake in the intestines.

      Di-Creatine malate boasts all the same strength and power benefits of creatine supplementation[16,17] with none of the “bloat” and GI distress that’s attributed to monohydrate use. Lastly, malic acid also helps improve endurance by acting as a buffer in your muscles, similar to what we explained up top with citrulline malate.[18]

      Supplement companies: STOP UNDERDOSING CREATINE!

      A long while back, we railed against creatine underdosing in an article titled Creatine is Broken. And Your Pre Workout is to Blame. This kind of nonsense does nothing but confuse beginning users, who think they’re getting creatine, but chances are this is something like under 100mg – less than 3% of what is needed!

      Yes, we know that we’re really here for the DMHA. But in the meantime, there will be some rookie users who are casualties of these awful marketing practices. Do it right or don’t do it at all.

      It’s not like it’s an expensive ingredient. Good God.

Flavors Available

Triple X Close Up

Make sure to stay tuned for our full review of Triple X coming out soon! Stack3d sure seems to love it!

If you’re feeling adventurous and looking to see just what DMHA has to offer, you can try Triple X in one of four flavors:

  • Green Apple
  • Watermelon
  • Orange (Phenomenal taste!)
  • Blue Raspberry

Looking for a fat burner equivalent? See Infrared

If you want to try this but are more into taking capsules or want it in a fat burning form factor, see Gold Star Infrared (which was renamed from its previous name, Viper).

Takeaway

Each new year seems to bring around a new fun stimulant for the masses to fall in love with. Will DMHA survive a full year is the question? We’ve seen other stims come and go recently, and with the more stringent approach the FDA has been taking in regards to supplements in general, you can expect this ingredient to catch a fair amount of hit.

So, if you’re really interested in seeing what DMHA / 2-aminoisoheptane / 2-amino-6-methylheptane has to offer, grab a tub of it soon, because you never know exactly when it may go away.

Just don’t expect this to meet your creatine and beta alanine needs. Take it for what it is – a way to try a new stimulant with a bunch of nonsense fluffed around it that you should probably supplement on top of. And for that reason, despite the fact that we enjoy it, it may still not crack our best pre workout supplements list – but that doesn’t mean more aggressive users shouldn’t try it.

So… we love it and hate it all at once. But when used for the right reasons, let’s admit it… we ultimately still love it.

Make sure to stay tuned to PricePlow as we’ll have a full detailed review coming out in a little while giving you our thoughts.

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References

  1. Deijen JB, Orlebeke JF; Effect of tyrosine on cognitive function and blood pressure under stress. Brain Res Bull. (1994)
  2. Dollins AB, et al; L-tyrosine ameliorates some effects of lower body negative pressure stress. Physiol Behav. (1995)
  3. Bailey, S; Acute L-arginine supplementation reduces the O2 cost of moderate-intensity exercise and enhances high-intensity exercise tolerance; School of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter; 2010
  4. Curis E., et. al; “Citrulline and the gut;”; Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care; September 2007
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20386132
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22251130
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12145119
  8. Rasmussen, N., & Keizers, P; “History Full Circle: Novel sympathomimetics in supplements” Drug testing and analysis; 2015; Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dta.1852/abstract
  9. Millan, M; “The role of monoamines in the actions of established and novel antidepressant agents: a critical review”; European Journal of Pharmacology; 500(1): 371-384; 2004. Retrieved fromhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014299904007472
  10. Fleckenstein, A., Volz, T., Riddle, E., Gibb, J., & Hanson, G; “New Insights into Mechanism of Action of Amphetamines”; Annual review of Pharmacology and Toxicology; 47: 681-698; 2007. Retrieved fromhttp://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.pharmtox.47.120505.105140
  11. Wise, R., & Bozarth, M; “Brain Mechanism of Drug Reward and Euphoria”; Journal of Psychiatric Medicine, 3(4): 445-460; 1985. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2893431
  12. Baguet, A et al.; Journal of Applied Physiology; “Important role of muscle carnosine in rowing performance;” July 2010;” 2005
  13. Kendrick IP, et al. The effects of 10 weeks of resistance training combined with beta-alanine supplementation on whole body strength, force production, muscular endurance and body composition. Amino Acids. (2008)
  14. Roger C. Harris; et al.; “The effect of a supplement containing β-alanine on muscle carnosine synthesis, ventilatory threshold and exercise capacity in Korean cyclists, during 12 weeks combined endurance and weight training
  15. Hill, CA et al.; Amino Acids; “Influence of beta-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle carnosine concentrations and high intensity cycling capacity;” February 2007
  16. Bemben, M; The effects of supplementation with creatine and protein on muscle strength following a traditional resistance training program in middle-aged and older men.; Neuromuscular Lab, Dept. Health & Exercise Science, U. Oklahoma; 2010
  17. Chilibeck, P; Effect of creatine ingestion after exercise on muscle thickness in males and females.; College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan; 2004
  18. Giannesini B., et. al.; European Journal of Pharmacology; “Citrulline malate supplementation increases muscle efficiency in rat skeletal muscle;” September 2011
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  • diane pham

    The fruit is kigelia africana extract that has the DMHA in it.

    • Yep, thanks! We have the study proving it and will post about it Monday

      • diane pham

        Awesome. I am looking forward to reading about it. I am curious about DMHA.