MuscleTech Reveals New Workout Stimulant: enfinity brand Paraxanthine!

For nearly half a decade, the sports supplement industry has been in search of a new workout stimulant to intelligently — and safely — power athletes through their training.

The pioneers at MuscleTech have found it, and it’s going to turn the dietary supplement industry — especially the energy category — completely on its head.

Introducing enfinity: pure paraxanthine in MuscleTech’s New iQ Series

Its name is enfinity, and it’s a pure form of paraxanthine, caffeine’s most potent metabolite. MuscleTech is pioneering its release, and unlike many other stimulants that are added to caffeinated formulas, this enfinity is here to replace your caffeine!

MuscleTech iQ Series: Introducing enfinity (Paraxanthine)

MuscleTech has revealed their new iQ Series of supplements, and it will include a new stimulant — paraxanthine — named enfinity. Learn how this lineup will forever revolutionize the entire energy industry

MuscleTech is releasing it in three different supplements:

  • EuphoriQ: Pre-Workout Supplement with 300 milligrams of enfinity (paraxanthine)
  • Burn iQ Powder: Smart thermo fat burning powder with 150 milligrams enfinity (paraxanthine) per scoop
  • Burn iQ: Capsule-based fat burner with 100 milligrams of enfinity (paraxanthine) per capsule

With paraxanthine instead of caffeine, users are noticing a far smoother energy experience, with less of the negative effects generally associated with higher doses of caffeine.

In this article, we show the labels and give a brief rundown of this next-generation stimulant and explain why the experience is so universally positive. But first, we showcase some of the shockingly accurate commentary from the blinded beta-testers recruited on PricePlow’s Discord, and allow you to sign up for our MuscleTech alerts, because we have a ton more information on its way:

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What is enfinity? Introducing Paraxanthine…

Everyone knows caffeine, the world’s most popular drug / dietary supplement ingredient that provides energy and wakefulness through its inhibition of phosphodiesterase and adenosine.[1]

The three metabolites of caffeine

Caffeine Metabolites

Caffeine has three major metabolites, and one of them (paraxanthine) does the heavy lifting. The other two have very long half-lives, which could be interfering with your quality of energy! Image courtesy Wikimedia

What most people don’t know is that the caffeine molecule itself isn’t doing most of that work. Once metabolized in the liver, caffeine leads to three metabolites, in order of prominence:

  1. Paraxanthine
  2. Theobromine
  3. Theophylline

Paraxanthine: doing the heavy lifting

It turns out that much of the heavy lifting of caffeine’s effects are done by the first of the group — paraxanthine — which has been shown to be a potent force both in terms of lipolysis (fat burning)[2] and adenosine antagonism.[3] It also provides much of the actual dopamine upregulation we feel when taking caffeine.[4]

Paraxanthine has stronger binding potencies for adenosine and leads to greater motor-activating effects than caffeine itself, and can increase processing speed, improve response time, and promote sustained attention while reducing errors.[5,6] We’re even seeing better muscle mass, strength, and endurance in mice with it![7] This (and more) will be covered in content as we dive deep into the new research.

Theophylline and theobromine – drivers of caffeine’s side effects?

It also turns out that when you take caffeine, the other two metabolites may actually be driving some of the side effects, if for no other reason that their half-lives are incredibly long — theobromine’s average half life is 6.2 hours and theophylline’s is 7.2 hours in humans.[8]

So when you take that 4pm dose of caffeine in your pre-workout supplement to hit the gym after work, your body has basically only cleared half of the theophylline and theobromine by 11pm. This can lead to awful sleep, as many of us have experienced after taking a stiff pre-workout too late.

Paraxanthine, on the other hand, has a shorter average half-life at 3.1 hours, leading to caffeine’s general half-life of 4.1 hours.[8] The above factors combined have led paraxanthine to demonstrate less toxicity in preclinical studies compared to caffeine itself — yet with greater wakefulness than drugs like modafinil![9]

Paraxanthine Reaction Time

Paraxanthine consumption leads to significantly reduced reaction time[6]

Does caffeine wreck you? You may be a slow metabolizer

Many of our followers need to keep caffeine doses low and only take them early in the day — if they take it at all. Research has shown that caffeine’s metabolism varies quite a bit across genetic and ethnic distributions.[10,11] Put very generally, there are slow, medium, and fast caffeine metabolizers, and those on the slower end of the spectrum don’t do very well with the compound.

Paraxanthine: a better experience for more users

enfinity Science

A brief intro to the science of paraxanthine / enfinity. We’ll cover far more data in the future!

What users are anecdotally finding thus far is that taking only paraxanthine itself leads to a far smoother and more consistent experience. Its shorter half-life works much better for slower metabolizers, especially without having to deal with the consequences of theobromine and theophylline hanging around for too long.

Even more interesting is that longer-term paraxanthine (those who are using it for a month or more), have consistently begun to say that caffeine feels “dirty” if they return to it.

Meanwhile, researchers have made statements such as, “As for paraxanthine it is also supposedly to be fairly harmless for humans”,[12] referencing research from the late 1980s![13] Newer safety and toxicity research also confirms this and more, showing a higher LD50 and no evidence of genotoxicity.[14]

enfinity: paraxanthine from a tested and trusted source

It’s time that paraxanthine was finally released to the world for those who are tired of caffeine and some of its consequences. Four individuals who are no strangers to the dietary supplement industry (nor to PricePlow Nation), Shawn Wells, Kylin Liao, Dr. Ralf Jaeger, and Dr. Martin Purpura have joined forces to form Ingenious Ingredients, shortened to ING2.

Developed and Tested at NNB Nutrition

Many readers will recognize Shawn Wells and Kylin Liao as leaders of NNB Nutrition, an industry-leading novel ingredient manufacturer where Shawn is the Chief Science Officer and Kylin is CEO. NNB is manufacturing, testing, and purifying this ingredient on behalf of ING2, who are the IP holders and also currently the distributors of enfinity.

NNB Nutrition

NNB Nutrition is a highly-trusted, innovative ingredient development company with an elite team of over 100 scientists from over 10 countries. Two of their executive officers, Shawn Wells and Kylin Liao, are part of the ING2 team. NNB will be manufacturing and purifying enfinity.

These veterans bring their elite manufacturing and biochemical expertise to the industry, providing an alternative energy source to caffeine. For many, this is the ingredient that you’ve been looking for. And MuscleTech will be the first to bring it to you in dietary supplements.

Shawn Wells has been on the PricePlow Podcast numerous times, and is scheduled to discuss paraxanthine alongside MuscleTech’s leadership.

We’ll be covering enfinity and paraxanthine in far greater detail in the future, but for now, let’s get into the three products MuscleTech will be releasing:

The MuscleTech iQ Series: Smarter Supplements

Over the years, MuscleTech has created countless energy supplements, and have brought some incredibly unique compounds and extracts to the industry. They’ve heard their customer base loud and clear: athletes want something new, something legally compliant, and something clean.

enfinity is just that ingredient – and MuscleTech is branding this the iQ Series, calling the smarter way to supplement. Let’s quickly look at the three supplements that will kick it off:

  • EuphoriQ Pre-Workout

    The aptly-named EuphoriQ pre-workout supplement is a caffeine-free — but certainly not stimulant-free — pre-workout experience with 300 milligrams of enfinity in a one-scoop serving. Offerint “Ultra-clean pre-workout energy”, MuscleTech is pairing this potent dose of paraxanthine with clinically-backed servings of L-citrulline (4 grams), beta-alanine(3.2 grams), and betaine anhydrous (2.5 grams).

    MuscleTech EuphoriQ Pre-Workout Supplement

    To make it even more interesting, they’re also utilizing the nootropic nitric oxide enhancement supplement nooLVL from Nutrition21. We often see nooLVL in gaming supplements, but thanks to its ability to improve blood flow, it’s a great crossover into cognitive-boosting pre-workout supplements.

    As you can see from the label attached, there’s more than that, including alpha-GPC as a choline source and L-tyrosine to keep the neurotransmitters flowing.

    If you’re tired of jittery pre-workouts, then get ready for the clean, smooth energy and cognitive enhancement of enfinity combined with nooLVL. This will be a can’t-miss supplement:

    MuscleTech EuphoriQ Flavors

    Learn the details in our article titled MuscleTech EuphoriQ: The Smart Pre-Workout with enfinity Paraxanthine.

    MuscleTech EuphoriQ – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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  • Burn iQ Smart Thermo (powder)

    MuscleTech isn’t one to leave dieters at bay, however. While there may be some lipolytic benefits from the paraxanthine in EuphoriQ, they really amp up the fat burning effects in Burn iQ Smart Thermo, a weight loss drink that’s optimized for energy, cognition, and shredding – keeping you level while dieting.

    MuscleTech Burn iQ Smart Thermo

    Each scoop has 150 milligrams of enfinity, and it relies on a large dose of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate to help mobilize the fat to the mitochondria for bruning.

    We’ll also see many popular and potent weight loss ingredients like coleus extract (standardized for forskolin), grains of paradise extract, phenylcapsaicin, and black pepper extract to amplify it all. If you haven’t noticed, there’s going to be some spice here, but you’ll be very pleased with the Sweet Heat flavor.

    A green coffee bean extract brings healthy chlorogenic acids to the powder, but don’t worry — it’s been decaffeinated — so you’ll get to experience paraxanthine alone as the only stimulant.

    MuscleTech Burn iQ Powder – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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    No spam, no scams.

    Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

    Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

  • Burn iQ Thermo (capsules)

    Finally, the company that brought Hydroxycut to the world isn’t going to leave the fat burner capsule category hanging! If you prefer not to drink your energy and want to take a few capsules before hitting the gym, Burn iQ provides a smarter way to get shredded.

    MuscleTech Burn iQ Smart Thermo Capsules

    Here, we have 100 milligrams of enfinity per capsule, so you can take anywhere from 1-3 to get your desired effects. Many of the other ingredients discussed above are the same, we’ll only have to sacrifice on the L-Carnitine dosage, since you can’t fit all that powder into just a few capsules.

    MuscleTech Burn iQ – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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    Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

    Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

MuscleTech Burn iQ Smart Thermo

MuscleTech Burn iQ Smart Thermo Powder

So no matter what your preference is – pills or powder, pre-workout or weight loss — MuscleTech has a smarter way for you to get clean energy from enfinity.

More to come!

This article is only the beginning. We’ll be covering each supplement in-depth, taste the flavors, discuss the research, and have PricePlow Podcast episodes to get into the weeds of this launch.

For years we’ve been waiting for The Next Big Thing, and it’s here from MuscleTech. Get ready to get smart – the iQ Series is set to revolutionize the energy industry.

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About the Author: Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is an n=1 diet experimenter with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several experiments done on himself while sharing lab tests.

Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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References

  1. Nehlig A, Daval JL, Debry G.; “Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects”; Brain Res Rev. 1992;17(2):139-170. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1356551/
  2. Hetzler RK, Knowlton RG, Somani SM, Brown DD, Perkins RM 3rd. Effect of paraxanthine on FFA mobilization after intravenous caffeine administration in humans. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1990 Jan;68(1):44-7. doi: 10.1152/jappl.1990.68.1.44; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2312486/
  3. Benowitz NL, Jacob P 3rd, Mayan H, Denaro C. Sympathomimetic effects of paraxanthine and caffeine in humans. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1995 Dec;58(6):684-91. doi: 10.1016/0009-9236(95)90025-X. PMID: 8529334. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8529334/
  4. Guerreiro S, Toulorge D, Hirsch E, Marien M, Sokoloff P, Michel PP. Paraxanthine, the primary metabolite of caffeine, provides protection against dopaminergic cell death via stimulation of ryanodine receptor channels. Mol Pharmacol. 2008 Oct;74(4):980-9. doi: 10.1124/mol.108.048207; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18621927/
  5. Xing, Dante, et al. “Dose-Response of Paraxanthine on Cognitive Function: A Double Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Trial.” Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 12, 15 Dec. 2021, p. 4478, 10.3390/nu13124478; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8708375/
  6. Yoo, Choongsung, et al. “Acute Paraxanthine Ingestion Improves Cognition and Short-Term Memory and Helps Sustain Attention in a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial.” Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 11, 9 Nov. 2021, p. 3980, 10.3390/nu13113980; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8622427/
  7. Jäger, Ralf, et al. “Paraxanthine Supplementation Increases Muscle Mass, Strength, and Endurance in Mice.” Nutrients, vol. 14, no. 4, 20 Feb. 2022, p. 893, 10.3390/nu14040893; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8875973/
  8. Lelo, A., et al. “Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Caffeine and Its Primary Demethylated Metabolites Paraxanthine, Theobromine and Theophylline in Man.” British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 22, no. 2, Aug. 1986, pp. 177–182, 10.1111/j.1365-2125.1986.tb05246.x; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1401099/
  9. Okuro, Masashi, et al. “Effects of Paraxanthine and Caffeine on Sleep, Locomotor Activity, and Body Temperature in Orexin/Ataxin-3 Transgenic Narcoleptic Mice.” Sleep, vol. 33, no. 7, July 2010, pp. 930–942, 10.1093/sleep/33.7.930; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2894435/
  10. Arnaud, Maurice J. “Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of Natural Methylxanthines in Animal and Man.” Methylxanthines, 19 Aug. 2010, pp. 33–91, 10.1007/978-3-642-13443-2_3; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20859793/
  11. Nehlig, Astrid. “Interindividual Differences in Caffeine Metabolism and Factors Driving Caffeine Consumption.” Pharmacological Reviews, vol. 70, no. 2, 7 Mar. 2018, pp. 384–411, 10.1124/pr.117.014407; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29514871/
  12. Monteiro, João P., et al. “Structure-Bioactivity Relationships of Methylxanthines: Trying to Make Sense of All the Promises and the Drawbacks.” Molecules, vol. 21, no. 8, 27 July 2016, 10.3390/molecules21080974; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6273298/
  13. Stavric, B. “Methylxanthines: Toxicity to Humans. 3. Theobromine, Paraxanthine and the Combined Effects of Methylxanthines.” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 26, no. 8, Jan. 1988, pp. 725–733, 10.1016/0278-6915(88)90073-7; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3058562/
  14. Purpura, Martin, et al. “An Assessment of Mutagenicity, Genotoxicity, Acute-, Subacute and Subchronic Oral Toxicity of Paraxanthine (1,7-Dimethylxanthine).” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 158, Dec. 2021, p. 112579, 10.1016/j.fct.2021.112579; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34597720/

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