Arms Race Nutrition Basics: Enhance Your Supplement Stack

PricePlow has covered several supplements from Arms Race Nutrition, and each one is incredibly unique. For instance, the recently-released Immunity Greens brought some new clinically-backed immune-boosting ingredients to greens powders, and we’ve never seen a good-mood nootropic as potent as Arms Race Clarity.

Arms Race Nutrition Basics

Boost your workout with the Arms Race Nutrition Basics!

Now Julian Smith, Doug Miller, and the rest of the “Arms Dealers” are taking a step back to help you fill in some of the gaps in your stack — with the Arms Race Nutrition Basics launch.

The Arms Race Nutrition Basics

  • Creatine Monohydrate
  • BCAA/EAA
  • Citrulline
  • Glutamine

This stack allows you to boost your training regimen, but on a budget — while supporting the men behind the brand you’ve loved and followed for years.

The BCAA/EAA formula is very unique, and one that we’ll highlight below. Meanwhile, we’ll never say no to a dash of extra creatine or citrulline, and will focus on the overlooked gut health benefits of glutamine. But before we get to that, check our Arms Race Nutrition alerts and see some of the PricePlow-driven prices below:

Arms Race Nutrition Creatine Monohydrate – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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Arms Race Nutrition Basics Overview

Arms Race Nutrition Basics is kicking off with four tried-and-tested supplements — three single-ingredient ones, and one multi-faceted, full spectrum EAA. There are no fillers or excipients inside – just quality, raw material ingredients for you to add to your stack, whether it’s to boost your pre workout or to add more umph to your protein powder or smoothie.

Below we cover a bit of each one:

  • Arms Race Nutrition BCAA/EAA

    The unflavored, vegan BCAA/EAA supplement is the most unique of the bunch, and a product we don’t generally see in “basics” / “core” series lineups. BCAA/EAA contains all nine essential amino acids, including a powerful 4:1:1 leucine:isoleucine:valine dosage of the three BCAAs.

    For many years, we’ve argued that a full-spectrum essential amino acid supplement is better than a simple BCAA supplement, with studies (and common sense) backing that claim up.[1,2] Why take three amino acids when you can take nine?

    Arms Race Nutrition BCAA/EAA

    Need a bit more mTOR signaling and muscle protein synthesis? Put this in your pre workout, protein powder, smoothie, or in a sports drink!

    The question is, “How are they dosed?” — and Julian and team soundly answer that question with a “Very well.” In BCAA/EAA, we have the following doses, with no small amounts of leucine or the “other six EAAs” inside:

    • Vegan Branched-Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs)

      • L-Leucine: 4000 mg
      • L-Isoleucine: 1000 mg
      • L-Valine: 1000 mg
    • Other Vegan Essential Amino Acids (EAAs)

      • L-Lysine: 1700 mg
      • L-Threonine: 1100 mg
      • L-Phenylalanine: 465 mg
      • L-Histidine: 350 mg
      • L-Methionine: 325 mg
      • L-Tryptophan: 60 mg

    Notable is the high dosage of methionine, which is extremely important, but often brings the worst taste. When you’re in the Arms Race, though, you’ll do what it takes.

    Our suggestion: add BCAA/EAA to a powerful tasting pre workout, carbohydrate drink mix, or enhance your protein or smoothie to a new level.

    They’re all in vegan form, so vegans who need additional critically-important EAAs to make up for lower protein bioavailability and doses in their diet should get a great boost without fear of spoiling their ethical goals.

    Arms Race Nutrition BCAA/EAA – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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  • Arms Race Nutrition Creatine Monohydrate

    What can we say about creatine monohydrate that hasn’t already been said? It’s beyond debate at this point – 3 to 5 grams per day, every day, and you’re going to be better off than you were without it. It’s that simple.

    Arms Race Nutrition Creatine

    3-5 grams per day, every day. It’s that simple.

    Creatine helps our bodies produce more ATP, which is the “energy currency” of our cells.[3-6] Through that effect, it helps with nearly everything, since ATP and mitochondrial health are the foundation of overall wellness and physical health and energy.

    We have so many studies on creatine, we can find benefits in nearly every area of sports performance:

    • Power[7,8]
    • Weight gain[8]
    • Lean mass[8-12]
    • Sprint speed,[13-15]
    • Hydration[16]
    • Fatigue reduction[17-20]
    • Overall well-being[21-23]
    • Improved cognition for vegetarians[24,25]
    • Potential testosterone improvements[26-30]
    • Better bone mineral density[11] (for non-meat eaters)

    The long story short is this: if you’re not eating tons of meat, add some more. Everyone can split hairs about when to do it, with opinions ranging from pre to post to before bed… to us, it doesn’t matter — just do it.

    Arms Race Nutrition Creatine Monohydrate – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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    Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

  • Arms Race Nutrition Citrulline

    Arms Race Nutrition Citrulline

    Need a touch more pump? Add in an extra scoop of Arms Race Nutrition Citrulline to your pre workout!

    Need more pumps in your workout? Then add some extra citrulline! By way of greater arginine production, citrulline is a nitric oxide booster with better bioavailability than taking arginine itself.[31]

    With more nitric oxide production, you get a vasodilation effect, leading to more blood flow — and that leads to more nutrient delivery and pumps!

    The amount you want to use depends on how much is already in your pre workout. In general, the clinical doses are 3-6 grams,[32,33] but we’ve seen research go far higher. It depends on your size, but in general, we’re happy trying to achieve an 8 gram dosage, which seems like the best cost/benefit ratio before the law of diminishing returns kicks in.

    If you’re the kind of athlete who gets battered by soreness, also consider that citrulline can help with that too![34,35]

    Arms Race Nutrition Citrulline – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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  • Arms Race Nutrition Glutamine

    Arms Race Nutrition

    Are you an Arms Dealer yet?

    What’s the most abundant amino acid in the body? Glutamine! We’re long past the days where it’s promoted as a muscle builder — it doesn’t work much for those purposes — but in certain users, it does support immunity,[36] endurance,[37] and gut health.[38] Like citrulline, it can help with recovery and soreness as well.[39]

    Our take: keep some extra glutamine on hand for your “sickness stack” and for when you just ruined yourself on leg day and know you’re going to be extra sore and unable to take the stairs tomorrow. Those are the occasions we want it in the pantry.

    Arms Race Nutrition Glutamine – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

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    Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

Arms Race Nutrition Boosts Your Workout

Arms Race Immunity Greens

Looking for a vastly different kind of Greens Powder that has real immune-boosting ingredients? Arms Race Immunity Greens may be what’s on tap this fall/winter!

So far, so good for Arms Race Nutrition in 2021. They’ve given everyone tools to stay healthy and optimized, but here we don’t need to break the bank. Most everyone knows about glutamine and creatine at this point. Citrulline awareness has come along as well – add a bit more to your pre workout for extra pumps without the extra stims of triple-scooping your pre.

But it’s the unflavored EAAs that are the underrated ingredients right now. If you’re not sure about your protein intake for the day, and have a powerful flavored drink to add them to, it can boost things up a notch to get you a bit more muscle protein synthesis going. Exactly what Julian and Doug want for you and your family!

If you’re an Arms Dealer and want a bit more out of your workouts, check out this Arms Race Basics series, and sign up for more news from PricePlow in the future:

Arms Race Nutrition Creatine Monohydrate – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

Get Price Alerts

No spam, no scams.

Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

About the Author: Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is an n=1 diet experimenter with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several experiments done on himself while sharing lab tests.

Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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References

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  2. Moberg M, Apró W, Ekblom B, Hall G Van, Holmberg H, Blomstrand E; “Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise”; Am J Physiol Cell Physiol; 2018:874-884; https://www.physiology.org/doi/pdf/10.1152/ajpcell.00374.2015
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  31. Curis E., et. al; “Citrulline and the gut;”; Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care; September 2007; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17693747
  32. Ochiai, Masayuki, et al. “Short-Term Effects of L-Citrulline Supplementation on Arterial Stiffness in Middle-Aged Men.” International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 155, no. 2, 8 Mar. 2012, pp. 257–261, 10.1016/j.ijcard.2010.10.004; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21067832/
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  35. Bendahan, D. “Citrulline/Malate Promotes Aerobic Energy Production in Human Exercising Muscle.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 36, no. 4, 1 Aug. 2002, pp. 282–289, 10.1136/bjsm.36.4.282; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1724533/
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  38. Benjamin, Jaya, et al. “Glutamine and Whey Protein Improve Intestinal Permeability and Morphology in Patients with Crohn’s Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 57, no. 4, 26 Oct. 2011, pp. 1000–1012, 10.1007/s10620-011-1947-9; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22038507/
  39. Legault, Zachary et al.; “The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.”; International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism vol. 25,5 (2015): 417-26. doi:10.1123/ijsnem.2014-0209; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25811544/

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