SteelFit Steel Releaf: Hemp-Based Pain Relief Gel in a Roll-On Stick!

SteelFit Steel Releaf Bottle

Introducing the newest release from SteelFit – Steel Releaf, a potent natural pain-relieving aid!

If you’ve been keeping up with industry news on PricePlow lately, there’s no doubt that you’ve come across SteelFit. The team behind this brand are industry veterans – they’ve been around for nearly 30 years, originally making a name for themselves with ProTan, a company popular within the bodybuilding industry for tanning topicals. Taking their expertise over to the supplement industry, however, has allowed these individuals to inject a new sense of diversification within the business, and based on what we’ve been seeing recently, we’re all for it!

Topical Pain Relief with Hemp… in a Roll-On Stick!

SteelFit Steel Releaf is a pain-relieving roll-on liquid that attacks acute pain and inflamed joints, calling on numerous ingredients in order to combat pain. If that didn’t get your attention already, get this – SteelFit is using perhaps the fastest-growing supplement ingredient out there these days, “Hemp”. That’s right, Steel Releaf contains 300mg of THC-free hemp-derived isolate, which helps take this formula from powerful to transcendent.

From the hemp isolate to lidocaine, there are so many clinically-tested pain-relieving agents here, and we’re incredibly excited to give you the rundown on the ingredients in Steel Releaf, and tell you why this formula is so powerful! Before we take that deep dive, however, make sure you’re subscribed to PricePlow, where you can find awesome supplement deals, news, and reviews!

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A quick Steel Recap

SteelFit Steel Releaf Promo

Lookiing for a way to fight pain as soon as it hits? SteelFit Steel Releaf may be what you’re looking for!

SteelFit has been on fire lately, hitting us with a ton of new releases, each of which as unique and effective as the last! Initially impressed with products like Steel Whey or Shredded Steel, we’ve continued to rave about more recent products, especially Multi-V, SteelFit’s great-tasting multivitamin powder! Even though the brand has continued to grow its product portfolio, venturing into new markets, their newest product has simply blown us away!

Steel ReleafNatural pain relief

Right from the start, Steel Releaf announces one of its most important qualities through its name – this topical primarily uses all-natural ingredients, many of which have been used for centuries. Combine these anecdotally tried-and-true ingredients with the growing reputation of hemp-derived compounds, and through the use of a little modern science, you have a potent pain-relieving forPmula.

This product is absolutely loaded, too – something we’ve become accustomed to with SteelFit. They spare no expense at packing as many quality ingredients into a label, as they always strive to put out the best possible formulas of their products that they can! Let’s jump right into this label – there’s so much to cover, we can’t waste any more time!

Steel Releaf Ingredients

SteelFit Steel Releaf Ingredients

Look at the insane amount of ingredients SteelFit uses here! And look all the way down, the “inactive” ones are just as important as the “actives”!

Although Steel Releaf only lists 2 active ingredients, there’s so much more working behind-the-scenes here. We’ll kick things off with the attention-grabbing hemp isolate, but don’t worry – we’ll plunge into the research on everything else, too!

  • Hemp-derived isolate (THC Free) – 300mg

    Hemp is a species of plant belonging to the Cannabis sativa family that has historically been used for its fibers, which are used to make clothing and bindings. However, it’s technically a form of a much more controversial plant, which has brought hemp to the forefront of recent discussion throughout society. The key difference between the two is one specific compound, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol,[1] also known as THC. This chemical provides the psychoactive effects tied to the Cannabis family, effects that are not related to the “industrial” hemp used in this product.

    Certified THC-Free with lab tests to prove it!

    In fact, leave all controversy at the door, because the isolate used in Steel Releaf is certified 100% THC-free. SteelFit even provides the lab tests that prove so![2]

    So, now that that’s out of the way, the hemp used here serves one purpose. This specific compound is growing increasingly popular these days, with many claiming it has great therapeutic abilities. What does the research say?

    Potential pain-reducing abilities, but…

    Because this hemp-derived compound is so new as an isolated ingredient, research is relatively light. That being said, there is some evidence out there that suggests it has significant benefits. A study from 2012 used mice to test the effects of “hemp”, specifically in identifying key processes the compound affects once in the system. They found that the chemical potentiates glycine currents, notably reacting with alpha-3 glycine receptors.[3] Thus, they believe that this interaction can significantly reduce chronic pain. Research from 2016 supports that final claim, as they tested the effect of transdermal “hemp” on mice with arthritis. After 4 days of application, scientists noted a significant reduction in inflammation and signs of pain, with no additional side effects.[4]

    No legal issues!

    Cannabidiol

    This product calls on the recovery-boosting benefits of cannabidiol

    While this should be somewhat obvious, the discourse around hemp warrants mentioning that this ingredient is legal at the American federal level. Because it contains 0% THC, it passes that federal threshold. While it should also be passable at the state level, as well, we suggest double-checking restrictions just in case!

    As promising as those studies may be, the main concern here is the lack of human research. While there are some studies that cite positive benefits of “hemp” anecdotally,[1] more scientific evidence is needed. That research is currently underway, and we’re interested to see what comes of it. At the moment, however, we have to note the potential of THC-free hemp-derived isolate, which gives reason for optimism.

  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride 4%

    If you’ve ever had some form of surgery, there’s a decent chance you’ve actually had interaction with lidocaine before. Lidocaine gel is commonly used as a local anesthetic, where it causes a numbing sensation that temporarily reduces feeling in the applied area.[5] That numbing effect can thus help alleviate pain in the applied area, making it a serviceable pain-fighting ingredient.

    While it is used in various surgical procedures,[6] as well as sold commercially, it often isn’t the only source of anesthesia used. The fact of the matter is that it’s not quite as strong in isolation, but in the case of Steel Releaf, that’s actually a desirable factor. This product isn’t meant to provide a level of anesthesia needed for surgery, rather, it’s just meant to help alleviate a burning or sharp, acute pain. Applying lidocaine topically can do just that, making it a perfect fit for this label!

  • Menthol 1%

    Meant Leaf

    Here to cool things off, menthol from mint leaves help reduce pain immediately!

    Coming from peppermint leaves, menthol is an analgesic commonly used in the world of sports medicine. It evokes the transient receptor potential ion channel TRPM8, which thus provides the cooling sensation that menthol is known for.[7] Research shows that this direct interaction is what induces the significant pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory effects many use the compound for.[7] It’s so effective, that its used to treat a wide variety of pains/discomforts, with an applicable range spanning from shoulder pain to digestive issues!

    While menthol doesn’t necessarily heal any particular ailment, it absolutely helps reduce some of the acute pain it may be causing. With lidocaine prepping the area by slightly numbing it, menthol cooly slides in to reduce inflammation and discomfort. It actively fights the exact things this product was meant to combat, and is therefore a key ingredient here!

  • The “inactive” ingredients – don’t overlook them!

    As we stated earlier, SteelFit absolutely packs each formula they produce, and the one in Steel Releaf follows suit. There are a bunch of ingredients listed in the “Inactive Ingredients” part of this label, but that doesn’t mean those ingredients don’t have integral roles here! Despite lacking the numbing or cooling effects of lidocaine and menthol, they actually hold their own when it comes to alleviating pain and inflammation!

    SteelFit makes use of many ingredients commonly found within Ayurvedic medicine, as well as other herbally-based practices. Here’s a bit on the ingredients listed that caught our eye:

    • Aesculus hippocastanum (Horse Chestnut) Seed Extract

      While the uniquely named horse chestnut can be found growing on trees, it’s actually a compound contained within the chestnut that warrants its inclusion on this label. Aescin is a natural mixture of saponins found within horse chestnut that seems capable of inhibiting inflammation.[8] It’s been clinically used to treat chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), in addition to treating acute inflammation following surgery or injury.[9]

    • Arnica montana Flower Extract

      Arnica Montana

      Arnica montana provides some active pain relief, fighting the source of your soreness!

      Following in the footsteps of horse chestnut, arnica is yet another natural anti-inflammatory root. Typically used as a topical to help treat arthritis, existing research supports its presence in Steel Releaf. In a study from 2002, 79 individuals were administered arnica gel to treat osteoarthritis located within their knees. 76% of the subjects noted improved symptoms and functioning within their knees after 6 weeks of using it.[10] Another study even went as far as concluding that arnica could be just as effective as ibuprofen, which speaks volumes to its pain-relieving capabilities![11]

    • Borago officinalis Seed Extract

      Borage oil is known for its high gamma linoleic acid (GLA) content, as it provides a substantial amount of this incredibly useful substance. GLA is converted into prostaglandin E1 once within the body, where it is then used to fight inflammation.[12] Research actually suggests that borage oil may be able to alleviate symptoms of arthritis, acting as a potent anti-inflammatory.[13]

    • Boswellia serrata Extract

      SteelFit Multivitamin

      Pair it with Steel Multi-V! It’s an insanely well-dosed multivitamin with plenty of Vitamins B, C, D, E, and K!

      Boswellia has been around for centuries, first popping up in folk medicine in Asia. It was used then to treat inflammatory illness, a purpose that modern research now validates. In 2008, scientists were able to identify how this anti-inflammatory compound works – it prevents leukotriene formation within the body, which thus helps inhibit inflammation.[14] More recent research supports that finding, showing that boswellia can effectively reduce knee pain following chronic use.[15]

    • Camellia oleifera (Green Tea) Leaf Extract

      While most of us likely drink green tea for its massive profile of polyphenols and antioxidants, the leaves can actually be dried up and turned into an oil, which is what’s included in Steel Releaf. Despite this altered form, it packs the same nutritional punch, providing the significant anti-inflammatory effect we all know and love![16]

    • Chamomilla recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract

      Clearly, tea leaves are pretty powerful, because we have a second type that shows up in Steel Releafchamomile! Touting an antioxidant profile similar to green tea, chamomile is also a potent anti-inflammatory. When applied as a topical ointment, research even suggests it may be equally as effective as hydrocortisone, an extremely popular synthetic pharmaceutical.[17] More tea, less inflammation!

    • Curcuma longa (Turmeric) Root Extract

      Turmeric is one of the trendiest “healthy foods” you can find these days, but unlike in some of those over-exaggerated cases, this herb fully lives up to the hype! Primarily, turmeric owes its powers to curcumin, its main compound, which has shown to be a powerful anti-inflammatory.[18] We are big fans of turmeric, and recommend you incorporate it into your diet. However, if its somewhat earthy taste isn’t for you, you’re in luck – you can still get a solid dose of curcumin in Steel Releaf!

    • Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil’s Claw) Root Extract

      Evening Primrose

      More pain-fighting GLA? Thanks, evening primrose!

      Devil’s claw, a rather interesting-looking plant, contains a number of beneficial antioxidants. It’s held in high regard due to its iridoid glycoside content – iridoids play a crucial role in warding off inflammation.[19] Therefore, it’s no wonder devil’s claw demonstrates some striking abilities. It’s fully demonstrated anti-inflammatory capabilities in vitro, as well as in animal studies.[20] Extensive human research isn’t out there just yet, but the mechanisms at play lead us to believe there’s some significant potential here!

    • Oenothera biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil

      Evening primrose oil shares a lot in common with borage oil, the most important similarity being a high concentration of gamma linolenic acid (GLA). Thus, it should come as no surprise that it shows similar effects – research from 2011 found evening primrose to capable of significantly improving symptoms of arthritis.[21]

    • Ribes nigrum (Black Currant) Fruit Extract

      Rounding out the GLA trifecta in Steel Releaf, we have black currant oil. This oil, you guessed it, also carries a large amount of GLA, and thus has capabilities similar to borage oil and evening primrose oil. Research shows its equally capable of reducing inflammation as those two oils,[21, 22] effectively rounding out a trio of GLA-powered anti-inflammatory agents on this label.

    • Salix alba (White Willow) Bark Extract

      Willow bark has been commonly used as a pain reliever for ages, citing its main active ingredient, salicin, as the source of its powers. Salicin, for lack of a better phrase, seems to fend off pain. Research shows that, due to its salicin content, willow bark is able to reduce pain and improve mobility,[23] with additional research showing such effects particularly in regards to joint health.[24]

Understanding this label is key

Wow – Just because Steel Releaf lists quite a few “inactive” ingredients doesn’t mean they’re insignificant! Practically each of them offers some sort of anti-inflammatory or pain-reducing effect, which magnifies the overall capabilities of this entire formula. They’re no afterthought – they share a prominent supporting role!

Steel Releaf is for acute pain and inflammation!

SteelFit Steel Dreams Relax

A recovery-boosting tandem of Steel Dreams and Steel Releaf?! Sign us up!

Although Releaf brings a bunch of effective pain-relieving agents to the table, it’s important that we underline this product’s true purpose. It’s developed for acute pain and soreness only, the kinds of discomforts you may come across in any given day. Maybe you sat too long at a desk and your lower back is sore, or your chest is sore after a tough bench press workout. Rolling some Steel Releaf on the given area can really do you some good, in these cases!

That being said, this product should really only be used in those scenarios. If you’ve done some major damage, such as tearing a muscle or dislocating a joint, rolling on this therapeutic formula won’t fix the issue. For these more serious concerns, it’s in your best interest to see a professional to get proper help!

Recovery is the name of the game, here – either post-workout or post-operation, Steel Releaf can provide some additional aid. It won’t fix the issue, but it will definitely make it more tolerable!

Conclusion – Ultimate Relief with Steel Releaf

Every time SteelFit puts out a new supplement, we’re left saying “wow”. They did it once again here, with another unique bombastic kitchen sink formula from the heavens.

SteelFit Steel Releaf PricePlow

Note that the label above is truncated, but we need to call attention to those “inactive” ingredients way at the bottom in Steel Releaf!!

The team behind the fantastic line of products at SteelFit have been around for quite a while, and they’ve built up a level of expertise that has allowed them to create some truly innovative and unique products. Over time, they’ve adopted one core trait at the center of each of their products – potency. Each product, from Steel Dreams to Multi-V, is formulated with only the best ingredients available, with each label practically overflowing of clinically-tested ingredients!

With roots in the realm of topicals, it’s only natural for SteelFit to venture back into that arena. Sure enough, Steel Releaf combines that experience with their new methodology. This loaded pain-relieving roll-on is made to fend off acute pain and inflammation, allowing you to keep your mobility and performance on point!

We’ve all been there – after a brutal shoulder workout, your arm is feeling a bit tight and uncomfortable. You don’t think there’s any serious damage, but nonetheless, it’s sore and it hurts. These types of situations are just Steel Releaf was built for – throw some on the inflamed area, and it’ll soon feel like brand new! Everything in this product makes up for a powerful, natural pain reliever, and thus makes Steel Releaf something you may want to have your hands on!

SteelFit Steel Releaf - Deals and Price Drop Alerts

Get Price Alerts

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Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

About the Author: Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is an n=1 diet experimenter with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several experiments done on himself while sharing lab tests.

Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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References

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  14. Singh, S, et al; “Boswellic Acids: A Leukotriene Inhibitor Also Effective through Topical Application in Inflammatory Disorders.”; Phytomedicine; Urban & Fischer; 28 Jan. 2008; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711307002917?via%3Dihub
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  23. Oltean, Hanna, et al; “Herbal Medicine for Low-Back Pain.”; The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; John Wiley & Sons, Ltd; 23 Dec. 2014; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25536022
  24. Nieman, David C et al; “A commercialized dietary supplement alleviates joint pain in community adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled community trial.”; Nutrition journal; vol. 12,1; 154; 25 Nov. 2013; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4176106/

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