Ghost Protein Drink RTD: What’s Inside?

Ghost Protein Drink RTD

Ghost Protein Drink is out, and it’s a phenomenal blend!

Heads up — and now, bottoms up! At the tail end of Episode S7:E32 of Ghost Lifestyle‘s Building the Brand YouTube Series, co-founders Ryan Hughes and Dan Lourenco teased a major product, and it’s now out:

Ghost Protein Drink is Here!

Ghost is incredibly well known for Ghost Whey, but this one’s a bit different. It’s an “RTD” (ready to drink) bottle that you can order from them directly or eventually find in any number of local stores or even gas stations.

It launched in two epic flavors (hopefully more to come), each bottle has 25 grams of protein next to 160 calories, but the protein blend is different than Ghost Whey – inside we have a combination of milk protein isolate with whey protein concentrate.

Before we dive in, be sure to sign up for our Ghost Protein alerts so that you get notified when new news comes out:

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Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

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Ghost Protein Drink RTD Macros

Ghost Protein Drink RTD Ingredients / Nutrition Facts

The Ghost Protein Drink RTD Ingredients / Nutrition Facts, with Chips Ahoy on the left and Cereal Milk on the right

  • Calories: 160

  • Protein: 25g

  • Fat: 4 – 4.5g

  • Carbs: 4 – 5g

    • Sugar: 1g

    • Fiber: 1g

The exact macros differ based upon flavor, so see the image up to the right if you care down to the half carb – in general, they’re roughly the same.

What’s unique about this product, however, is the protein blend used. It’s not just a straight whey protein that Ghost consumers are used to, so we dive into that next:

Ghost Protein RTD Ingredients

Following filtered water on the label, we see two transparently labeled dairy-based protein sources:

  • Milk Protein Isolate – 17.65g Delivering 15g Protein

    Ghost chose to lead with milk protein isolate, which is 85% protein by weight, which yields less fat, carbohydrates, and lactose that the traditional milk protein concentrates used in other RTDs. Ghost Protein Drink is thicker than a standard whey protein shake due to the components inside: milk protein isolate is a high-quality protein source that’s made up of 80% casein (a slower-digesting protein) and 20% whey (a faster-digesting protein).[1]

    The casein inside leaves a thicker drink that simply works better in RTD form – but you don’t want too much thickness, which is why whey concentrate is added for the next ingredient:

  • Whey Protein Concentrate – 13g Delivering 10g Protein

    Ghost Protein RTD Launch Ladies

    Team Ghost has theirs, and they’re loving it

    The other protein source is whey protein concentrate (WPC), which can range from 34% to 80% protein by weight. You can tell by the yield (13 grams delivers 10 grams of complete protein) that it’s 77% protein by weight, which is an indication of a very high quality WPC.

    While this means that there’s a bit more fat and milk sugar (lactose) provided,[2] it also means we have some additional beneficial immune-boosting components like immunoglobulins, lactoglobulins, and lactoferrin.[3,4]

    Beyond these ingredients, Ghost adds flavor systems (sorry, unlike the Ghost Whey Chips Ahoy flavor, we don’t have inclusions here), oils, gums, gels, salt, and sweetening to tie the whole package together in one delicious drink.

Flavors Available

Below is an up-to-date list of the flavors available:

    What’s Next For Ghost?

    Launching Ghost Energy in 2020 was a huge accomplishment for the brand, especially being the first brand to bring licensed flavor collaborations to another industry. Ghost Energy is now widely available, and it’s on a matter of time before this Ghost Protein Drink RTD is as well.

    Ghost Energy

    If you haven’t tried Ghost Energy yet, you’re missing out!

    Remember, Ghost’s mission is outperform what they did in the previous year. With this launch in 2021, and everything covered on our Ghost News page throughout the year (including all of the “V2” supplements), they’re going to be hard-pressed to do it.

    Where’s that protein bar, by the way?

    But remember, Ghost is working on a protein bar, which they revealed in November 2019 in S6:E22 of their “Building The Brand” YouTube series. Inside, Dan and Ryan taste-tested one of the first samples of we assume is intended to be the Ghost Protein Bar (they tried a cookies n’ cream flavor). Stay tuned for more information about that.

    It was about time for Ghost Protein RTD

    This launch wans’t too surprising, given the massive success of Ghost Energy, their first foray into the battle for fridge space. This will easily contend for RTD space on those shelves, and any store with the opportunity to showcase these is insane not to – especially that bold Chips Ahoy! bottle.

    As always, stay tuned to PricePlow for all of your Ghost news alerts, we’ll notify you when there’s more information:

    Ghost Protein RTD – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

    Get Price Alerts

    No spam, no scams.

    Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

    Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

    Ghost Protein RTD Teaser 4

    Easiest 25 grams of protein ever

    Note: This article was originally published on September 15, 2021 and updated on November 24, 2021 with the full label.

    About the Author: Mike Roberto

    Mike Roberto

    Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is an n=1 diet experimenter with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several experiments done on himself while sharing lab tests.

    Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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    References

    1. McGregor, Robin A, and Sally D Poppitt. “Milk Protein for Improved Metabolic Health: A Review of the Evidence.” Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 10, no. 1, 2013, p. 46, 10.1186/1743-7075-10-46; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3703276/
    2. Burrington, K; “Technical Report: Milk Fractionation Technology and Emerging Milk Protein Opportunities”; 2013; https://www.thinkusadairy.org/assets/documents/Customer%20Site/C3-Using%20Dairy/C3.7-Resources%20and%20Insights/03-Application%20and%20Technical%20Materials/Milk_FractionationTechReport_FINAL_07-10-13.pdf
    3. Riechel, P., et al. “Analysis of Bovine Lactoferrin in Whey Using Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) and Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography (MEKC).” Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 443, 1998, pp. 33–39; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9781340
    4. El-Sayed, Mayyada M. H., and Howard A. Chase. “Trends in Whey Protein Fractionation.” Biotechnology Letters, vol. 33, no. 8, 19 Mar. 2011, pp. 1501–1511, 10.1007/s10529-011-0594-8; https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10529-011-0594-8

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