1

American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies: A Smarter Ginger-Flavored Snack

Let’s face it: we all like to have a good snack. There are times when the work we’re doing is so mentally demanding that we just need a little extra hit of glucose to get us through it – but what should we reach for in times like these?

Certainly not the standard American snack fare – potato slices fried in toxic, hyper-oxidized omega-6-laden “seed oils” that have traditionally been used as paint thinner and engine lubricant, or, in the case of linseed oil, to polish the chrome on aircraft fuselages.

American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies

American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies are here, and they bring a hit of ginger flavor!

Those oils — which are contained in the vast majority of commercial snack foods — will actually induce profound physiological insulin resistance[1] via the Randle Cycle while being digested, thus preventing you from achieving your goal of supplying fresh glucose to your neurons.

American Metabolix Gummies are here with a healthier way to snack

As long as you’re going to carb up, it’s better to opt for some cleaner carbs that will give you energy without causing transient metabolic-devastating symptoms.

And that’s where American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies come in. But compared to all of the sweet stuff out there, these have some zing to them – because a delicious ginger flavor has been added!

We argue that this is a better way to snack. Our reasoning is below, along with a deep-dive on the curcumin-containing turmeric inside. First, let’s check prices and make sure you’re ready for American Metabolix news alerts:

American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

Get Price Alerts

No spam, no scams.

Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

With only 5 grams of carbs per serving, these gummies will help you dial in your glucose intake to just the right level – but with a sizeable dose of curcumin-containing turmeric, they can also help support your brain and reduce systemic inflammation on those days when you’re dealing with a lot of stress at work.

The sugar source for these gummies is glucose syrup – a good choice for those who are trying to avoid fructose out of concerns about non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).[2]

American Metabolix Turmeric Gummy Ingredients

In a single two gummy serving of Turmeric Gummies from American Metabolix, you get the following:

  • Turmeric Powder (100 mg) & Turmeric Extract (30 mg)

    American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies Ingredients

    Two different turmeric/curcumin based active ingredients. But the last ingredient on this label gives away some information on the flavor — it has a ginger kick to it!

    Turmeric, along with ginger, is a member of the Zingiberaceae family of plants. Various parts of the turmeric plant, but especially the root, have been used for thousands of years in ancient Indian ayurvedic medicine to treat a wide range of ailments.[3]

    Most turmeric extracts are standardized for curcumin, a bright orange phytochemical produced by turmeric and ginger plants. Curcumin is actually the pigment that gives the roots their bright orange and yellow colors.[4]

    Dosing of Turmeric and Curcumin

    Although the concentration of curcumin in turmeric is generally about 3% by weight,[5] it’s only one of several curcuminoids that occur naturally in the turmeric plant, and all have broadly similar effects.[6]

    Because of their powerful ability to reduce oxidative stress[7-13] and the inflammation typically associated with it,[14-19] curcumin and the other curcuminoids have been identified by researchers as having strong potential in the prevention of numerous diseases, as well as in supporting the health of various organs, including the liver, the cardiovascular system, and the nervous system.[20]

    This “broad-spectrum” curcuminoid action, among other things, is probably why curcumin and turmeric itself have similar overall benefits for human health.[21]

    So for the purposes of this article, understand that we’re treating curcumin and turmeric more or less interchangeably – we believe this is justified based on the current state of the research. Although you probably won’t get high-dose curcumin-specific benefits from eating these gummies, they can move you in the right direction as far as systemic inflammation and the associated illnesses are concerned. We count that as a win, especially if used to replace candy or other snacks, but leave it to the reader to decide whether it’s worth diving into.

    Turmeric and Inflammation

    While the NF-κB pathway is one of the main targets of curcumin, it’s definitely not the only pathway targeted![22]

    Much of turmeric’s anti-inflammatory activity comes from the fact that curcumin actually inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme,[23-25] the same enzyme targeted by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen. Partly by interfering with the action of COX-2, curcumin prevents the synthesis of prostaglandins,[26] a class of messenger molecules that trigger the body’s inflammatory response.

    Turmeric and Cardiovascular Health

    One of the big drivers of heart disease is endothelial dysfunction.[27] When the smooth muscle layer inside of your arteries loses its ability to regulate blood pressure and arterial diameter, heart disease is one of the results.[27] Fortunately, curcumin has been shown to improve endothelial function,[28] and even partially reverse the progression of heart disease.[29,30]

    Once again, chronic inflammation is the link: out-of-control inflammatory processes seem to be one of the main causes behind endothelial dysfunction.[31] So given turmeric’s profound anti-inflammatory properties, it’s no surprise that it would help improve endothelial function.

    In one study, heart disease patients who took curcumin had a 65% lower chance of heart attack while in the hospital, compared to a placebo group.[32] These are studies worth knowing – but very few mainstream medical “experts” ever discuss them!

    Turmeric and the Brain

    American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies

    According to a recent high-powered meta-analysis, curcumin has the ability to raise levels of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain.[33] That’s a big deal because BDNF is principally responsible for promoting synaptic plasticity and dendrite growth in the brain,[34] and is necessary for adult neurogenesis in specific brain regions like the hippocampus.

    Believe it or not, this effect size of the curcumin-driven BDNF increase is so big that curcumin has been shown to improve symptoms in people with diagnosed depression and anxiety,[35] and has actually been proposed as a potential adjunct treatment for Major Depressive Disorder[35] in countries where high dietary turmeric consumption is rare.

    Curcumin’s profoundly beneficial impact on the brain is a big clue to its value as a promoter of overall health, since the brain is uniquely vulnerable to oxidative stress,[36] making brain health a “canary in the coal mine” when it comes to the integrity of a person’s antioxidant defenses.

    Because chronic inflammation negatively affects the expression of BDNF, you can think of curcumin’s effect on BDNF partly as a proxy measure of its anti-inflammatory powers.[37]

    In other words, anything powerful enough to measurably reduce the burden of oxidative stress on your brain is probably going to pay big dividends for the rest of your body, too.

    Other Effects of Turmeric

    Curcumin for Inflammation

    How curcumin (and some other ingredients discussed below) can affect the pro-inflammatory cytokines, discussed on this page

    No big surprise then that curcumin has been found to significantly reduce chronic pain[38-51] and alleviate symptoms in people suffering from osteoarthritis.[38-51]

    It can also promote healthy digestion in people with gastric disease,[52] and curcuminoids have also been identified as compounds capable of improving liver function in alcoholics.[53]

    So, as you can see, there are a ton of potential benefits associated with high turmeric/curcuminoid consumption, and with low levels of inflammation. Given that the modern environment and dietary habits are so pro-inflammatory,[54] and with chronic inflammation’s status as a growing public health burden, a little extra anti-inflammatory support will almost certainly benefit most supplement consumers. Especially when turmeric consumption is notably low in Western countries.

    Timing is key if you’re chasing muscle gains

    American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies Label

    The full back panel label

    Note for athletes: if you’re trying to gain muscle, you should avoid the heavy use of anti-inflammatory compounds (including turmeric and curcumin) immediately after exercise. The reason is that inflammation in response to exercise is what initiates muscle protein synthesis – so if you suppress inflammation through supplementation, you don’t get all your gains.

    You don’t have to avoid anti-inflammatories altogether: just make sure that you don’t use them around the time you exercise. Rest days are a good time to tamp down on inflammation without inhibiting muscle growth.

  • Black Pepper Extract – 2 mg

    So now that we’ve established the incredible benefits of curcumin and curcuminoid consumption via turmeric, the question remains: how much are we actually absorbing the curcuminoids that occur naturally in turmeric?

    Unfortunately, the answer is that on their own, the bioavailability of curcuminoids from turmeric is quite low.[55,56]

    Fortunately though, piperine, a component of black pepper fruit, has been shown to dramatically increase the bioavailability of curcumin – by as much as 2000%, in fact.[57]

    So that’s mostly what black pepper extract is doing here: ensuring that you absorb as much of the beneficial compounds from the turmeric in these gummies as you possibly can.

On the flavor: note the ginger!

Ginger

Heads up – there’s a hit of ginger flavor in these!

These gummies are a unique experience. Don’t come expecting insanely sweet candy – they actually have some kick to them, partly thanks to the black pepper extract but also the ginger flavor inside. Because of this combo, they don’t taste like “curry” – they’re pleasantly potent, and make for a great treat to satisfy a sugar craving without making you want to invade a candy store for more.

The more we try, the more we notice that the ginger flavor is what comes through more than anything!

These honestly won’t be for everyone, but if you think you might like the benefits of turmeric with a hit of sugar — not too much and not too little — then give these a shot.

American Metabolix Keto Greens Review

How about some Gummies and Greens? Soon, we’ll crack into the American Metabolix Keto Greens!

Takeaway: A snack with zing

If you’re gonna snack, do it right – eat something with some nutraceutical value. Anything containing turmeric, even with a smaller dose of active curcumin, is going to have some anti-inflammatory effect. If you’re the type of person that likes ginger candies, you won’t be disappointed in the flavor.

American Metabolix is adding this to their overall health stack, which includes their Keto Greens, a product we’ll be covering in the future. Get ready for the gummies and greens stack, and sign up for our American Metabolix alerts below:

American Metabolix Turmeric Gummies – Deals and Price Drop Alerts

Get Price Alerts

No spam, no scams.

Disclosure: PricePlow relies on pricing from stores with which we have a business relationship. We work hard to keep pricing current, but you may find a better offer.

Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

References

  1. Peat, Ray; “Glycemia, Starch, and Sugar in Context.” Raypeat.com; https://raypeat.com/articles/articles/glycemia.shtml
  2. Jensen, Thomas et al; “Fructose and sugar: A major mediator of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease”; Journal of Hepatology; vol. 68,5; 1063-1075; 2018; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5893377/
  3. Jayaprakasha, G.K., et al. “Chemistry and Biological Activities of C. Longa.” Trends in Food Science & Technology, vol. 16, no. 12, Dec. 2005, pp. 533–548, 10.1016/j.tifs.2005.08.006; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0924224405002049
  4. DiSilvestro, Robert A, et al. “Diverse Effects of a Low Dose Supplement of Lipidated Curcumin in Healthy Middle Aged People.” Nutrition Journal, vol. 11, no. 1, 26 Sept. 2012, 10.1186/1475-2891-11-79; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3518252/
  5. Tayyem RF, Heath DD, Al-Delaimy WK, Rock CL. Curcumin content of turmeric and curry powders. Nutr Cancer. 2006;55(2):126-31. doi: 10.1207/s15327914nc5502_2; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17044766/
  6. Amalraj A, Pius A, Gopi S, Gopi S. Biological activities of curcuminoids, other biomolecules from turmeric and their derivatives – A review. J Tradit Complement Med. 2016 Jun 15;7(2):205-233. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcme.2016.05.005; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28417091/
  7. Prasad, S., & Aggarwal, B. (2011). Turmeric, the Golden Spice. Oxidative Stress and Disease Herbal Medicine, 263-288. doi:10.1201/b10787-14; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92752/
  8. DiSilvestro, Robert A, et al. “Diverse Effects of a Low Dose Supplement of Lipidated Curcumin in Healthy Middle Aged People.” Nutrition Journal, vol. 11, no. 1, 26 Sept. 2012, 10.1186/1475-2891-11-79; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3518252/
  9. Kalpravidh, Ruchaneekorn W., et al. “Improvement in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Parameters in Beta-Thalassemia/Hb E Patients Treated with Curcuminoids.” Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 43, no. 4-5, 1 Mar. 2010, pp. 424–429, 10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2009.10.057; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19900435/
  10. Baum, Larry, et al. “Six-Month Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Pilot Clinical Trial of Curcumin in Patients with Alzheimer Disease.” Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 28, no. 1, Feb. 2008, pp. 110–113, 10.1097/jcp.0b013e318160862c; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18204357/
  11. Biswas, Jaydip, et al. “Curcumin Protects DNA Damage in a Chronically Arsenic-Exposed Population of West Bengal.” Human & Experimental Toxicology, vol. 29, no. 6, 1 June 2010, pp. 513–524, 10.1177/0960327109359020; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20056736/
  12. Srivastava, Shobhit, et al. “Curcuma Longa Extract Reduces Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Osteoarthritis of Knee: A Four-Month, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Inflammopharmacology, vol. 24, no. 6, 19 Oct. 2016, pp. 377–388, 10.1007/s10787-016-0289-9; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27761693/
  13. T Krishnareddy, Naveen, et al. “A Novel Curcumin-Galactomannoside Complex Delivery System Improves Hepatic Function Markers in Chronic Alcoholics: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.” BioMed Research International, vol. 2018, 2018, p. 9159281, 10.1155/2018/9159281; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30345312/
  14. Belcaro, Gianni, et al. “Efficacy and Safety of Meriva, a Curcumin-Phosphatidylcholine Complex, during Extended Administration in Osteoarthritis Patients.” Alternative Medicine Review: A Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, vol. 15, no. 4, 1 Dec. 2010, pp. 337–344; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21194249/
  15. Chainani-Wu, Nita, et al. “High-Dose Curcuminoids Are Efficacious in the Reduction in Symptoms and Signs of Oral Lichen Planus.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 66, no. 5, May 2012, pp. 752–760, 10.1016/j.jaad.2011.04.022; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21907450/
  16. Khajehdehi, Parviz, et al. “Oral Supplementation of Turmeric Attenuates Proteinuria, Transforming Growth Factor-β and Interleukin-8 Levels in Patients with Overt Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy: A Randomized, Double-Blind and Placebo-Controlled Study.” Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, vol. 45, no. 5, 31 May 2011, pp. 365–370, 10.3109/00365599.2011.585622; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21627399/
  17. Khajehdehi, Parviz, et al. “Oral Supplementation of Turmeric Decreases Proteinuria, Hematuria, and Systolic Blood Pressure in Patients Suffering from Relapsing or Refractory Lupus Nephritis: A Randomized and Placebo-Controlled Study.” Journal of Renal Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 1, Jan. 2012, pp. 50–57, 10.1053/j.jrn.2011.03.002; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21742514/
  18. Hanai, Hiroyuki, et al. “Curcumin Maintenance Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: Randomized, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 4, no. 12, Dec. 2006, pp. 1502–1506, 10.1016/j.cgh.2006.08.008; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17101300/
  19. Amalraj, Augustine, et al. “A Novel Highly Bioavailable Curcumin Formulation Improves Symptoms and Diagnostic Indicators in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Two-Dose, Three-Arm, and Parallel-Group Study.” Journal of Medicinal Food, vol. 20, no. 10, 2017, pp. 1022–1030, 10.1089/jmf.2017.3930; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28850308/
  20. Xu XY, Meng X, Li S, Gan RY, Li Y, Li HB. Bioactivity, Health Benefits, and Related Molecular Mechanisms of Curcumin: Current Progress, Challenges, and Perspectives. Nutrients. 2018 Oct 19;10(10):1553. doi: 10.3390/nu10101553; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30347782/
  21. Nagpal, Monika, and Shaveta Sood. “Role of curcumin in systemic and oral health: An overview.” Journal of natural science, biology, and medicine vol. 4,1 (2013): 3-7. doi:10.4103/0976-9668.107253; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3633300/
  22. Noorafshan, Ali, and Soheil Ashkani-Esfahani. “A Review of Therapeutic Effects of Curcumin.” Current Pharmaceutical Design, vol. 19, no. 11, 2013, pp. 2032–2046; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23116311/
  23. Soleimani, V., Sahebkar, A., & Hosseinzadeh, H. (2018). Turmeric (Curcuma longa) and its major constituent (curcumin) as nontoxic and safe substances: Review. Phytotherapy Research, 32(6), 985-995; doi:10.1002/ptr.6054; https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ptr.6054
  24. Camacho-Barquero, Laura, et al. “Curcumin, a Curcuma Longa Constituent, Acts on MAPK P38 Pathway Modulating COX-2 and INOS Expression in Chronic Experimental Colitis.” International Immunopharmacology, vol. 7, no. 3, Mar. 2007, pp. 333–342, 10.1016/j.intimp.2006.11.006; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17276891/
  25. Aggarwal, Sita, et al. “Curcumin (Diferuloylmethane) Down-Regulates Expression of Cell Proliferation and Antiapoptotic and Metastatic Gene Products through Suppression of IkappaBalpha Kinase and Akt Activation.” Molecular Pharmacology, vol. 69, no. 1, 2006, pp. 195–206, 10.1124/mol.105.017400; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16219905/
  26. Koeberle A, Northoff H, Werz O. Curcumin blocks prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis through direct inhibition of the microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1. Mol Cancer Ther. 2009 Aug;8(8):2348-55. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-09-0290; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19671757/
  27. Karimian MS, Pirro M, Johnston TP, Majeed M, Sahebkar A. Curcumin and Endothelial Function: Evidence and Mechanisms of Protective Effects. Curr Pharm Des. 2017;23(17):2462-2473. doi: 10.2174/1381612823666170222122822; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28228072/
  28. Santos-Parker, Jessica R et al. “Curcumin supplementation improves vascular endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults by increasing nitric oxide bioavailability and reducing oxidative stress.” Aging vol. 9,1 (2017): 187-208. doi:10.18632/aging.101149; https://www.aging-us.com/article/101149/text
  29. Jiang S, Han J, Li T, Xin Z, Ma Z, Di W, Hu W, Gong B, Di S, Wang D, Yang Y. Curcumin as a potential protective compound against cardiac diseases. Pharmacol Res. 2017 May;119:373-383. doi: 10.1016/j.phrs.2017.03.001; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1043661816313603
  30. Li H, Sureda A, Devkota HP, Pittalà V, Barreca D, Silva AS, Tewari D, Xu S, Nabavi SM. Curcumin, the golden spice in treating cardiovascular diseases. Biotechnol Adv. 2020 Jan-Feb;38:107343. doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2019.01.010; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0734975019300102
  31. Castellon, Xavier, and Vera Bogdanova. “Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Endothelial Dysfunction.” Aging and disease vol. 7,1 81-9. 2 Jan. 2016, doi:10.14336/AD.2015.0803 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4723236/
  32. Wongcharoen W, Jai-Aue S, Phrommintikul A, Nawarawong W, Woragidpoonpol S, Tepsuwan T, Sukonthasarn A, Apaijai N, Chattipakorn N. Effects of curcuminoids on frequency of acute myocardial infarction after coronary artery bypass grafting. Am J Cardiol. 2012 Jul 1;110(1):40-4. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.02.043; https://www.ajconline.org/article/S0002-9149(12)00846-6/fulltext
  33. Sarraf P, Parohan M, Javanbakht MH, Ranji-Burachaloo S, Djalali M. Short-term curcumin supplementation enhances serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult men and women: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutr Res. 2019 Sep;69:1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2019.05.001; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31279955/
  34. Colucci-D’Amato L, Speranza L, Volpicelli F. Neurotrophic Factor BDNF, Physiological Functions and Therapeutic Potential in Depression, Neurodegeneration and Brain Cancer. Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Oct 21;21(20):7777. doi: 10.3390/ijms21207777; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33096634/
  35. Fusar-Poli L, Vozza L, Gabbiadini A, Vanella A, Concas I, Tinacci S, Petralia A, Signorelli MS, Aguglia E. Curcumin for depression: a meta-analysis. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2020;60(15):2643-2653. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2019.1653260; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33096634/
  36. Patel, Manisha. “Targeting Oxidative Stress in Central Nervous System Disorders.” Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, vol. 37, no. 9, Sept. 2016, pp. 768–778, 10.1016/j.tips.2016.06.007; https://www.cell.com/trends/pharmacological-sciences/fulltext/S0165-6147(16)30074-8
  37. Calabrese, Francesca et al. “Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a bridge between inflammation and neuroplasticity.” Frontiers in cellular neuroscience vol. 8 430. 22 Dec. 2014, doi:10.3389/fncel.2014.00430; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4273623/
  38. Srivastava, Shobhit, et al. “Curcuma Longa Extract Reduces Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Osteoarthritis of Knee: A Four-Month, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Inflammopharmacology, vol. 24, no. 6, 19 Oct. 2016, pp. 377–388, 10.1007/s10787-016-0289-9; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27761693/
  39. Belcaro, Gianni, et al. “Efficacy and Safety of Meriva, a Curcumin-Phosphatidylcholine Complex, during Extended Administration in Osteoarthritis Patients.” Alternative Medicine Review: A Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, vol. 15, no. 4, 1 Dec. 2010, pp. 337–344; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21194249/
  40. Panahi, Yunes, et al. “Curcuminoid Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Phytotherapy Research, vol. 28, no. 11, 22 May 2014, pp. 1625–1631, 10.1002/ptr.5174; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24853120/
  41. Belcaro, G., et al. “Product-Evaluation Registry of Meriva, a Curcumin-Phosphatidylcholine Complex, for the Complementary Management of Osteoarthritis.” Panminerva Medica, vol. 52, no. 2 Suppl 1, 1 June 2010, pp. 55–62; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20657536/
  42. Togni, et al. “Comparative Evaluation of the Pain-Relieving Properties of a Lecithinized Formulation of Curcumin (Meriva), Nimesulide, and Acetaminophen.” Journal of Pain Research, Mar. 2013, p. 201, 10.2147/jpr.s42184; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3596124/
  43. Agarwal, Krishna Adit, et al. “Efficacy of Turmeric (Curcumin) in Pain and Postoperative Fatigue after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Double-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study.” Surgical Endoscopy, vol. 25, no. 12, 14 June 2011, pp. 3805–3810, 10.1007/s00464-011-1793-z; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21671126/
  44. Madhu, K., et al. “Safety and Efficacy of Curcuma Longa Extract in the Treatment of Painful Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Inflammopharmacology, vol. 21, no. 2, 16 Dec. 2012, pp. 129–136, 10.1007/s10787-012-0163-3; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23242572/
  45. Nakagawa, Yasuaki, et al. “Short-Term Effects of Highly-Bioavailable Curcumin for Treating Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Prospective Study.” Journal of Orthopaedic Science, vol. 19, no. 6, Nov. 2014, pp. 933–939, 10.1007/s00776-014-0633-0; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC4244558/
  46. Haroyan, Armine, et al. “Efficacy and Safety of Curcumin and Its Combination with Boswellic Acid in Osteoarthritis: A Comparative, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 18, no. 1, 9 Jan. 2018, 10.1186/s12906-017-2062-z; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC5761198/
  47. Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai, et al. “Efficacy and Safety of Curcuma Domestica Extracts Compared with Ibuprofen in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Multicenter Study.” Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 9, Mar. 2014, p. 451, 10.2147/cia.s58535; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3964021/
  48. Panda, Sanjib kumar, et al. “A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo Controlled, Parallel-Group Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Curene versus Placebo in Reducing Symptoms of Knee OA.” BioMed Research International, vol. 2018, 25 Oct. 2018, pp. 1–8, 10.1155/2018/5291945; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC6222223/
  49. Chandran, Binu, and Ajay Goel. “A Randomized, Pilot Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Curcumin in Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis.” Phytotherapy Research, vol. 26, no. 11, 9 Mar. 2012, pp. 1719–1725, 10.1002/ptr.4639; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22407780/
  50. Amalraj, Augustine, et al. “A Novel Highly Bioavailable Curcumin Formulation Improves Symptoms and Diagnostic Indicators in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Two-Dose, Three-Arm, and Parallel-Group Study.” Journal of Medicinal Food, vol. 20, no. 10, 2017, pp. 1022–1030, 10.1089/jmf.2017.3930; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28850308/
  51. Shep, Dhaneshwar, et al. “Safety and Efficacy of Curcumin versus Diclofenac in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Open-Label Parallel-Arm Study.” Trials, vol. 20, no. 1, 11 Apr. 2019, 10.1186/s13063-019-3327-2; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC6460672/
  52. Dulbecco, P., & Savarino, V. (2013). Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases. World journal of gastroenterology, 19(48), 9256-70; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882399/
  53. T Krishnareddy N, Thomas JV, Nair SS, N Mulakal J, Maliakel BP, Krishnakumar IM. A Novel Curcumin-Galactomannoside Complex Delivery System Improves Hepatic Function Markers in Chronic Alcoholics: A Double-Blinded, randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study. Biomed Res Int. 2018 Sep 23; 2018:9159281. doi: 10.1155/2018/9159281. Erratum in: Biomed Res Int. 2019 Mar 3;2019:5673740; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6174784/
  54. Margină D, Ungurianu A, Purdel C, Tsoukalas D, Sarandi E, Thanasoula M, Tekos F, Mesnage R, Kouretas D, Tsatsakis A. Chronic Inflammation in the Context of Everyday Life: Dietary Changes as Mitigating Factors. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 Jun 10;17(11):4135. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17114135; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32531935/
  55. Sharma, R. A., et al. “Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Study of Oral Curcuma Extract in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.” Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, vol. 7, no. 7, 1 July 2001, pp. 1894–1900; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11448902/
  56. Lao, Christopher D, et al. “Dose Escalation of a Curcuminoid Formulation.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 6, no. 1, 17 Mar. 2006, 10.1186/1472-6882-6-10; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC1434783/
  57. Shoba, G., Joy, D., Joseph, T., Majeed, M., Rajendran, R., & Srinivas, P. (1998). Influence of Piperine on the Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin in Animals and Human Volunteers. Planta Medica, 64(04), 353–356. doi:10.1055/s-2006-957450; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9619120