Clear Muscle.. Clarified. MuscleTech’s New Supp Reviewed

Clear Muscle is Out!

Clear Muscle is Out!

Last year at the 2014 Arnold Sports Festival, we saw tons of new product releases and announcements. One of the most intriguing was from the team at MuscleTech.

“The most powerful muscle builder in history”

Claiming they were on the verge of releasing “the most powerful muscle builder in history,” in a university study, MuscleTech’s new Clear Muscle has demonstrated proven gains (16 pounds of muscle in 12 weeks).

MuscleTech has a bit of a reputation in the industry for making extreme declarations about their supplements, but they’ve been on the right track in recent years, toning down their marketing and releasing well-dosed, open-label products. So this caught us by surprise.

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MuscleTech was secretive about the identity of the main ingredient, simply calling the product “Clear Muscle.” But after citing weight gains, and where the study was conducted (University of Tampa), we decided to do some digging to try to identify the elusive key ingredient.

MuscleTech Clear Muscle is Coming! Read the research, and if you like it, get product notifications from PricePlow here!

MuscleTech Clear Muscle is coming! Read the research, and if you like it, get product notifications here from PricePlow!

HMB Free Acid – An HMB Metabolite

What we came up with is a presentation by Jacob Wilson, PhD, CSCS and assistant professor at the University of Tampa, at the 2013 ISSN (International Society of Sports Nutrition) conference, called “Effects of HMB Free Acid and Oral ATP on Human Performance.” You’ve probably heard of HMB since it’s been on the market for many years, however, what we have here is a new type of HMB.

You see, all of the HMB currently on the market is calcium-bonded HMB. This new form is a free acid of the ingredient and comes with significant absorption benefits.

Talking Supplement Absorption

Dr. Jacob Wilson - The man behind the research

Dr. Jacob Wilson – The man behind the research

There are a few different measures for how well absorbed a supplement is, and in all of these, the free acid outperforms calcium HMB.[1] These measures are:

  • Cmax – The maximum concentration of an ingredient in serum. In this case, free acid HMB reaches a maximum concentration around 75% higher than that of calcium-HMB.
  • Tmax – How long it takes for the supplement to reach its peak concentration. Free acid HMB reaches its peak in just 30 minutes, while calcium-HMB takes between one to two hours.
  • AUC – If you plot out a graph the increase and eventual decrease back to baseline after supplementation with an ingredient, and measure the total area of that line, you get AUC; (area under curve). For HMB free acid, it’s nearly double (~95% higher) that of calcium HMB.

On paper, HMB free acid appears to have significant benefits over calcium-HMB, now lets get back to Dr. Wilson’s study for some more information on what to expect.

The Study

The study was performed over a 12-week period of supplementation, with 3g of HMB free acid per day. The subjects were trained athletes with at least three years of lifting experience. They were required to follow a brutal training regimen, involving three days of training per week, consisting of three different workouts:

  • Hypertrophy on Mondays
  • Power on Wednesdays
  • Heavy lifting day on Fridays

Training volumes for these workouts were in the range of 40,000-plus pounds.

At the end of the study, much in line with what MuscleTech’s marketing claims, the HMB group gained 16 pounds of lean muscle, while reducing their body fat, from an average of 21% to 14%. Truly astounding results to gain so much muscle while also cutting substantial body fat.

Considerations

There are a few things you need to remember to keep expectations in line.

University of Tampa Human Performance Center

Note that the athletes trained in a world-class facility surrounded by some of the best trainers in the industry.

The trainees in Wilson’s study were utilizing very intense training protocols that vastly exceed most lifters. Also, they were being coached through their routines by some of the brightest minds in the exercise physiology world and under careful monitoring at the University of Tampa Human Performance Research Lab.

Additionally, the study evaluated participants in the absence of any other supplementation. Most supplement users are already probably supplementing with leucine, of which HMB is a metabolite.

With these ideal situations in mind, you should certainly not go out and buy Clear Muscle with the expectation that you will gain 16 pounds of lean muscle. However, the product appears to be validated by science, and should deliver results in the real world.

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So in the end, we’re extremely excited for this one, we love the way MuscleTech’s been doing business the past couple of years, and we highly encourage you to sign up for price drops up above and we’ll update you when any store beats the lowest price!

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References

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21134325
Posted in , , by Mike | Tagged , , | 4 Comments
  • SH

    At the end of the study, much in line with what MuscleTech’s marketing claims, the HMB group gained 16 pounds of lean muscle, while reducing their body fat, from an average of 14% to 21%. Truly astounding results to gain so much muscle while also cutting substantial body fat.

    ……..
    Uh… i didnt know reducing body fat from an average of 14% to 21% was indeed REDUCING???? Wouldnt that be an increase in body fat %?

  • SH

    Also…. isn’t HMB used to help increase weight gain, not only regarding to muscle but fat as well? That’s what was listed in the HMB Link on this page earlier in the article.

    “HMB has been misrepresented for years and a lot of the literature leaves readers confused about what it is and who it’s for. Essentially, people who are trying to lose weight or following a restrictive diet shouldn’t take HMB. A metabolite, HMB prevents fat loss, even with a low calorie diet and intense exercise. It’s not a weight loss supplement, but rather a tool for bulking up.”

  • RK

    @SH – Hey, that was just a typo in the body fat %s, it should have been reversed, they reduced their body fat from 21% to 14%

  • RK

    Also @SH – Yes, HMB reduces fat loss *In a defecit*, so for someone on a cut, supplementing with HMB probably wouldn’t be ideal.

    In a caloric surplus however, the effects are different, as you should see pretty consistently in studies on HMB.

    A lot of the variance also probably comes with training intensity. Many of the studies on HMB used very casual exercise routines, or no exercise routines at all. Just take a look at what the placebo group gained in this study to see that.