The Top 5 Anxiety Supplements

Looking to relax?

Here are the top five supplements for relaxation:

  1. L-Theanine

    Our favorite way to chill. If you’re Type A and want to know what it’s like to care less, this is one way to find out.

    If you’re a Type A individual and you’ve ever wanted to know what it feels like to be a relaxed, carefree “Type Bro” without using recreational drugs, 200mg of L-theanine will do you good. This might be especially beneficial because L-theanine can take the edge off of many stimulants, reducing the body’s stress reaction to adrenal hormones.We actually suggest starting at 100mg for most people, but Sherman is a big guy who may need a bit extra this week.

    This naturally-occurring amino acid works by preventing brain cell death and promotes growth in anti-stress areas of the brain.

  2. Phenibut

    This nootropic packs multiple punches for the quick-hitting Sherman. Being a standout Stanford grad, he’ll enjoy the brain-enhancing effects of this neurotransmitter booster.[1]

    One can best describe phenibut’s effects as tranquilizing.Better watch out though, it can amplify any narcotic painkillers in your system.

  3. 5-HTP

    The metabolism of 5-HTP. Notice how trytophan gets involved in there too?

    The metabolism of 5-HTP. Notice how trytophan gets involved in there too?

    As the precursor to serotonin, many believe that 5-HTP is the “happiness neurotransmitter.” While Sherman’s happiness really lies in what happens on February 2nd, this is an easy “hack” to boost serotonin levels in the brain, giving a rewarding feeling without doing much to deserve it.Taking 5-HTP may backfire on Sherman, though. It’s effects are often described as “euphoric,” which may lead to more YouTube gold. But we wouldn’t necessarily complain if that happened.

    5-HTP is typically taken in 300mg to 500mg doses, doled out throughout the day.

  4. GABA

    Short for gamma-aminobutyric acid, this is your nervous system’s main inhibitor. It’s considered the “downer” neurotransmitter since it regulates many sedative functions (which may be malfunctioning in Sherman).

    GABA counters glutamate, one of your “upper” neurotransmitters

    GABA counters glutamate, one of your “upper” neurotransmitters.

    GABA supplementation is typically around 3g to 5g, but the brain is quite adept at regulating levels – it’s only likely to work if Sherman’s levels are already low, or if it is taken in higher doses (which is not recommended).Remember that pre-workout supplement we joked about earlier? Well, its nitric-oxide boosting effects may also significantly increase his GABA uptake.[2]

    Note: The Phenibut mentioned above is a derivative of GABA. It is not recommended to take them together.

  5. Melatonin

    We doubt anyone on the Seahawks got much sleep last night, nor will they get a ton over the next two weeks. The good news is that the hormone melatonin can help normalize your sleep/wake rhythm. It also works well for jet lag, for all you Pro Bowlers headed to Hawaii.

    Stick with a dose of 3mg (2.5mg is optimal). While some might recommend a higher dose, numerous studies have shown 3mg to be the most effective, and increased doses can actually be less effective.

As always, these statements are not approved by the FDA, and you should consult your doctor before beginning any new supplement program. Definitely do not mix any of these supplements together.

About the Author: Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is an n=1 diet experimenter with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several experiments done on himself while sharing lab tests.

Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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References

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2431377
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11849830

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