Protein Window Myth BUSTED: Nutrition News Jan 14, 2014

Mike with PricePlow back at you with a MASSIVE update!

We start things off with the latest news, since there’s some really good stuff.

Nutrition News – January 13, 2014

There’s been a bunch of things going down in the industry recently. Here’s a recap.

  • The “Protein Window” is Nonsense?

    Alan Aragon and his team published a massive meta-analysis of over 43 studies about “Protein Timing.”

    Their conclusion? It’s basically BS.

    In their research, they determined that the most important thing for both strength and hypertrophy (muscle growth) is the quantity of protein. Not whether protein was used within 1 hour before workout or within 2 hours post workout.

    It’s mostly all about hitting those numbers. Not necessarily all at once, but it doesn’t necessarily have to be pre/post workout either!

    Alan Aragon - This man knows his business when it comes to nutrient timing

    Alan Aragon – This man knows his business when it comes to nutrient timing

    His findings discuss that there are two problems with most of the studies they assessed:

    1. The fact that many of the studies did not control the total amount of protein. Those who did not consume protein during those windows often had lower protein consumption in general. This lower amount of protein is what the analysis’ statistics show to be the real problem.
    2. Many studies used untrained participants. “Beginner gains” occur almost no matter when when dealing with untrained subjects, so it is important to factor that into the analysis, and also look closely at what happens in trained subjects.

    Aragon and the research team then go on to postulate that the fabled “anabolic window” may actually be as long as 4-6 hours, but it is difficult to determine.

    In his earlier discussion from last year, Nutrient Timing Revisited, the team also discussed some other strategies. It all boils down to a bit of common sense – it is “safe” to get protein in roughly 90 minutes before — and 90 minutes after — a 60 minute workout.

    Either way, the basic statement is that you don’t need to get protein in immediately before or immediately after your workout. You just gotta hit your stinkin numbers.

    It’s all very interesting.

    Read more at the new study, The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis[1], and last year’s Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window?[2]

  • Fat-Loss Study on EGCG + Resveratrol: Short Term Success!

    A new fat-loss study has been done on EGCG, the green tea catechin, along with resveratrol. Conclusion? It works! At least in the short-term, as this was a 3-day study.

    The researchers showed that when mixing EGCG (282mg/day) + Resveratrol (200mg/day), both energy expenditure and metabolic flexibility were improved compared to placebo in men and women.

    However, when soy isoflavones were added in at 80mg/day, the effects were reversed in women! Metabolic flexibility was measured by the respiratory quotient after lunch or dinner meals (post-prandial).

    Read more at Short-term supplementation with a specific combination of dietary polyphenols increases energy expenditure and alters substrate metabolism in overweight subjects[3].

    We don’t have an EGCG category, but you can see some EGCg products in our Green Tea Extract category. We need someone to write this page now!

References

  1. The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis
  2. Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window?
  3. Short-term supplementation with a specific combination of dietary polyphenols increases energy expenditure and alters substrate metabolism in overweight subjects.

About the Author: Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto

Mike Roberto is a research scientist and water sports athlete who founded PricePlow. He is an n=1 diet experimenter with extensive experience in supplementation and dietary modification, whose personal expertise stems from several experiments done on himself while sharing lab tests.

Mike's goal is to bridge the gap between nutritional research scientists and non-academics who seek to better their health in a system that has catastrophically failed the public.

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