Quest MCT Oil Powder Coming for the Clean Cooks

A little while back during the Quest Protein Powder launch, it was also leaked that Quest Nutrition would be releasing an MCT Oil Powder.

Quest’s upcoming MCT Oil Powder promises to give you the craving-crushing power of MCT Oil in a format that’s perfect for baking and mixing into shakes.

You can see our Quest Nutrition page to compare prices on all products, or sign up for product alerts below. After that, keep reading for more details!

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When Is a Carb Not a Carb and a Fat not a Fat?

If you’re not familiar with MCT (medium-chain triglyceride) oil, it’s a unique form of fatty acid that’s processed differently than any other type of fat. The body always burns it immediately for energy as if it was a carbohydrate, regardless of any other circumstances or how much is taken in. It can never be converted to stored fat!

MCT oil is found in coconut oil, palm oil, and most dairy products, but it’s mixed in those with high levels of standard saturated fat, so it has to be extracted for use as an appetite suppressant and weight loss aid.[1]

It’s typically been sold in a liquid form, but powders are now beginning to show up on the market.

What’s the advantage of powder?

Well, one issue is that MCT oil has a much lower boiling point than other cooking oils, so it’s never really been seen as very useful for clean-eating recipes (outside of making smoothies and puddings that don’t require any heating).

In powder form, however, it’s ideal for baking. The powder actually been used for some time now by those with Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MADD)[2] and Glyceric Acidemia Type II as a common ingredient in cooking, as diets from these conditions have to be very low in both standard fat and protein.

Quest MCT Oil Powder

It’s coming soon!

The advantage to a more general population (and particularly those looking to drop weight) is that MCT provides the same feeling of satiety that standard fats do, but without the caloric load.

MCT oil also has an almost completely neutral flavor. It’s about as bland as it gets, which is bad if you were hoping to just dump some over salad or popcorn, but great if you want to easily substitute it into an existing recipe without having unpredictable flavor results.

The one thing that’s really important to remember with MCT oil is that though it provides immediate energy, it doesn’t really have any nutritional value (it’s a lot like caffeine in that regard). So it can’t be used as a total substitute for other fats — you still need to stay on top of your macronutrients and ensure you’re getting enough healthy dietary fats in. But it’s perfect for sweet “cheat” snack recipes that won’t bust your diet.

Keep an eye out for Quest’s new brown rice powder and coconut oil powder (also coming soon), as coconut and unsweetened cocoa combined with a zero-calorie sweetener are a great base for recipes that include Quest Protein Powder.

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Posts are sponsored in part by the retailers and/or brands listed on this page.

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References

  1. Clegg, M; Food Sciences and Nutrition; Medium-chain triglycerides are advantageous in promoting weight loss although not beneficial to exercise performance; November 2010
  2. Leslie, N; Very Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; 2009
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